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» Cinematour Forum   » Cinema Yak   » What 70mm engagements have you seen (and where)? (Page 3)

 
This topic comprises 4 pages: 1  2  3  4 
 
Author Topic: What 70mm engagements have you seen (and where)?
John McConnel
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Posts: 2
From: Okmulgee, OK
Registered: Oct 2006


 - posted December 08, 2006 11:04 AM      Profile for John McConnel   Email John McConnel         Edit/Delete Post 
Speaking of the Rivoli as a premiere house, I saw CLEOPATRA there, in 70mm, during its first-run engagement in the 1960s. I was a 70mm fanatic from a small town in Oklahoma, and was looking forward to going to the Rivoli.

The Rivoli had as big a screen as could be fit in, and its front row of seats were as close as they could go. When I bought my ticket, the only seats available were 4 on the front row of the left-most section. I took one of them, and had to twist in the seat and crane my neck see the picture.

The theatre was impressive, the sound was awesome, and the picture was bright and sharp. But I had to crane my neck so much to see it that it was sore the rest of the night. My most vivid memories of the visit are the columns in front of the theatre, Elizabeth Taylor's cleavage, and my sore neck.

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Dave Felthous
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From: Seattle, WA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted December 10, 2006 05:45 PM      Profile for Dave Felthous   Email Dave Felthous         Edit/Delete Post 
I saw "Days of Heaven" in 70mm at the Music Box in Seattle. I couldn't believe that it wasn't Scope; just the standard old 1.85. Why did they bother with 70mm?

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Dan Roben
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From: Seattle, WA
Registered: May 2003


 - posted December 10, 2006 10:56 PM      Profile for Dan Roben           Edit/Delete Post 
Dave,

Are you sure about Days of Heaven playing in 1:85? As I recall, the projected image practically overwhelmed the Music Box.

Maybe my mind is playing tricks on me. It's been many years (28?) since it screened there.

Nonetheless, that film benefitted from 70MM's finer grain and sharper image, and better sound, even if it was in 1:85. It's quite possibly the most beautiful film ever created, and I urge anyone to check it out, hopefully in a theater.

Unfortunately, it no longer exists in 70MM. The organizers of the 2004 Seattle Cinerama/Wide Screen Festival tried to secure a print, but were told that none existed and that the master print had been accidentally destroyed.

Well, that's what Parmaount claims anyway.

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Michael Coate
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From: Los Angeles, CA
Registered: Feb 2004


 - posted December 10, 2006 11:56 PM      Profile for Michael Coate   Email Michael Coate         Edit/Delete Post 
There are 70mm prints of "Days Of Heaven." They're just not available for circulation.

BTW, the 70 blow-ups were in a 2.00:1 ratio, slightly wider than 1.85:1.

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Michael Coate
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From: Los Angeles, CA
Registered: Feb 2004


 - posted December 11, 2006 02:07 AM      Profile for Michael Coate   Email Michael Coate         Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
I haven't been lucky enough to see any 70 mm films except for IMAX. However the nearby Century Dome(now Cinearts Pleasant Hill) has played some 70 mm movies. I'm sure Return of the Jedi played there in 70 mm.

It did!

http://www.fromscripttodvd.com/return_of_the_jedi_70mm_engagements.htm

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Mark Campbell
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From: Seattle, WA
Registered: Oct 2004


 - posted December 11, 2006 09:03 AM      Profile for Mark Campbell   Email Mark Campbell         Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
BTW, the 70 blow-ups were in a 2.00:1 ratio, slightly wider than 1.85:1.
Most of the 70mm blow ups I have seen have been from Scope pictures, with the exception of the restored Vertigo whic I believe was projected in 1,85:1. I know that the general practice for Scope blow ups was to crop the sides of the 2.35:1 frame slightly to make it 2.0:1.

What was the general practice for 1.85:1 blow ups? Crop the tops and bottoms?

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Mark Richey
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From: Fort Worth, TX
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted December 11, 2006 11:30 AM      Profile for Mark Richey   Author's Homepage   Email Mark Richey         Edit/Delete Post 
What exactly caused 70mm to die out? Did studios stop releasing 70mm films because there were a lack of theaters showing them, or did theaters stop showing them because there were so few 70mm titles coming out?

Given the huge megaplexes that are being built, you would think some chain or another would install a 70mm projector at one in a big city, and studios would be interested in releasing some of their big titles in that format. Or has IMAX officially replaced 70mm these days?

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Mark Campbell
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From: Seattle, WA
Registered: Oct 2004


 - posted December 11, 2006 12:05 PM      Profile for Mark Campbell   Email Mark Campbell         Edit/Delete Post 
My bet is 35mm Digital Sound killed it. Plus 70mm prints must have been expensive.

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Richard A Stegman Jr
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From: Calimesa,CA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted December 11, 2006 01:27 PM      Profile for Richard A Stegman Jr   Email Richard A Stegman Jr         Edit/Delete Post 
Yeah,my guess would be the expense.

However,the sentence "Presented in 70mm 6-track Digital Stereo" does have an enticing ring to it.

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Bill Gabel
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From: New York, NY
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted December 11, 2006 03:10 PM      Profile for Bill Gabel           Edit/Delete Post 
It was the sound that 70MM prints could do. Once the Digital sound formats were in place and proven. The studio could save in the cost of releases by 35mm in Digital sound. So 70MM as a release format died to a point. Only to be used for special venue engagements.

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Mark Campbell
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From: Seattle, WA
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 - posted December 11, 2006 06:00 PM      Profile for Mark Campbell   Email Mark Campbell         Edit/Delete Post 
Still curious if anyone had an answer to my question:

What was the general practice for 1.85:1 blow ups? Crop the tops and bottoms?

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Michael Coate
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From: Los Angeles, CA
Registered: Feb 2004


 - posted December 11, 2006 10:16 PM      Profile for Michael Coate   Email Michael Coate         Edit/Delete Post 
Mark:
The general practice in the '60s and '70s was to crop the top and bottom. In the '80s and '90s, most 1.85:1 films retained that ratio in 70mm by having black matte printed on the left and right edges of the 70mm frame.

By the way, Mark, you quoted me a few posts ago regarding my comment about blow-ups being in a 2.00:1 aspect ratio. I suspect you misunderstood my point. I was not making a general comment; I was making a specific comment regarding the 70mm prints of "Days Of Heaven," which, I'll repeat for clarity, were in a 2.00:1 ratio (with only a slight bit of black matte on its left and right edges).

I also think some confusion exists regarding the projection ratio of 70mm. It is 2.20:1, not 2.00:1.

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Ron Keillor
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From: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Registered: May 2003


 - posted December 11, 2006 10:47 PM      Profile for Ron Keillor   Email Ron Keillor         Edit/Delete Post 
Coppola's ONE FROM THE HEART played the Vogue Vancouver in 70mm. I don't remember the surrounds being used, but our resident tech told me that only the ouside L + R and centre speakers were used behind the screen, the purpose of the 70mm print being to get a wider sound stage (instructions from Coppola about this came with the print). The curtains had to open to 'scope so the sound would come through from those speakers, and the booth ports were masked so that no scratches or negative dirt flashes would appear. I think additional light cloth border masking was installed also as the regular masking did not come in far enough. A lot of trouble could have been saved by simply changing the speaker leads and using a 35mmm print, but then I didn't think much of the film.
The booth in this theatre is placed quite high, so there is evident keystoning on the screen, particularly in "flat" presentations and 16mm.

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Michael Coate
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From: Los Angeles, CA
Registered: Feb 2004


 - posted December 11, 2006 11:20 PM      Profile for Michael Coate   Email Michael Coate         Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
Coppola's ONE FROM THE HEART played the Vogue Vancouver in 70mm.
And this was a rare example of a 1.37:1 image on a 70mm print. Lots of black printed on the sides of the frame. I recall the Vancouver engagement promoting it as a "70mm Academy Frame Dolby" presentation.

quote:
the purpose of the 70mm print being to get a wider sound stage
I always assumed the purpose of using 70mm prints for "One From The Heart" was to ensure it got projected in 1.37:1. I imagine many, if not most or all, of the venues screening it in 35mm would've ignored the filmmaker recommendation and cropped the image down to 1.85:1 as they would for any other 35mm spherical print.

[ December 12, 2006, 08:26 PM: Message edited by: Michael Coate ]

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Michael Coate
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From: Los Angeles, CA
Registered: Feb 2004


 - posted January 10, 2007 10:14 PM      Profile for Michael Coate   Email Michael Coate         Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
i also saw "The Black Stallion in 70mm
quote:
"The Shining" in 1980 at another late,great Vegas landmark,the single screen Mann Fox
quote:
Star Trek I, SRO Cinerama
It seems unlikely that any of these titles were actually seen in 70mm as claimed.

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