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» Cinematour Forum   » Cinema Yak   » largest screen (Page 1)

 
This topic comprises 2 pages: 1  2 
 
Author Topic: largest screen
Michael Mohan
New Member

Posts: 10
From: Los Angeles, CA
Registered: Jun 2006


 - posted June 16, 2006 12:59 PM      Profile for Michael Mohan   Author's Homepage   Email Michael Mohan         Edit/Delete Post 
This is a really dorky question, and I haven't seen it covered in other posts, but I'm wondering what the largest non-imax screen is in both southern california, but also the US.

It seems like the cinerama dome might be the largest at 86 feet. With the chinese (80 feet) and the village (65 feet) behind. There's supposedly some theatre in ontario that is 85 feet-- can anyone confirm this?

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Chris Utley
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Posts: 631
From: Torrance, CA
Registered: May 2003


 - posted June 16, 2006 03:03 PM      Profile for Chris Utley   Author's Homepage   Email Chris Utley         Edit/Delete Post 
The screen at Grauman's Chinese IS NOT(!) 80 feet wide. It's only 60 feet wide. Small in comparison to the Dome, the Village and even a few other spots in Southern Califormia, but still a nice sized screen nevertheless.

The 85 footer you're talking about is the Grand Palace auditorium at Regal/Edwards Ontario Palace 22 - the complex also has 2 auditoriums with 70 footers in them and I believe I've spotted a few 50-60 footers, too. The newer built Pacific Theatres complexes (with the exception of Arclight) all have 1-2 auditoriums with either 60 or 70 footers. The Regal/Edwards Big Newport in Newport Beach has a 70 footer while their Irvine Spectrum 22 just down the road has 4 60 footers (named the Palace, Chinese, Egyptian & Hollywood).

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Mark Campbell
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Posts: 437
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: Oct 2004


 - posted June 16, 2006 04:47 PM      Profile for Mark Campbell   Email Mark Campbell         Edit/Delete Post 
Anyone know the width of the National's screen in Westwood? (For that matter, does anyone know the fate of the National?)

Also, question for curved screens, does one measure the width following the line of the cirqumference or does one make a straight (and shorter) measurement between the endpoints of the screen.

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Michael Mohan
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Posts: 10
From: Los Angeles, CA
Registered: Jun 2006


 - posted June 16, 2006 05:02 PM      Profile for Michael Mohan   Author's Homepage   Email Michael Mohan         Edit/Delete Post 
Thanks Chris! I recall the Century 25 theatre in Orange having 2 huge auditioriums as well.

Mark-- in terms of the westwood theatres:

Village - 65 foot screen, seats 1341
National - 60 foot screen, seats 1106
Bruin - 50 foot screen, seats 696
Crest - 50 foot screen, seats 700
Regent - 35 foot screen, seats ??
Festival - ?? foot screen, seats 560
Avco - who cares

(i actually live walking distance to the village). With curved screens, that's an interesting question. my guess is that it's the actual circumference.

In terms of the fate of the National-- it's really sad, but there's never anyone there. Recently, they've been playing films on more than one screen in westwood too, which seems abnormal. Poseidon was playing there and at the Bruin. Da Vinci was there and at the Festival.

on another note-- anyone know the sizes/specs of the century city 15?

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Mark Campbell
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Posts: 437
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: Oct 2004


 - posted June 16, 2006 05:20 PM      Profile for Mark Campbell   Email Mark Campbell         Edit/Delete Post 
Actually, it would be interesting to know the Avco, before and after split.

I never would have guessed that the Crest was bigger than the Bruin. It always seemed smaller.

Hopefully the guy who took over the Crest would like to try his hand with the National. My dream would be doing the Arclitght treatment to the National.

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Dan Roben
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Posts: 155
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: May 2003


 - posted June 16, 2006 05:28 PM      Profile for Dan Roben           Edit/Delete Post 
The Seattle Cinerama's screen measures 90'x 32' when the actual Cinerama screen is being used (rarely, but it is used on occasion for special events). Their regular screen (slightly curved) measures 68' across.

The actual circumference of a curved screen is measured to determine screen width, not 'point-to-point'.

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Michael Mohan
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From: Los Angeles, CA
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 - posted June 16, 2006 06:35 PM      Profile for Michael Mohan   Author's Homepage   Email Michael Mohan         Edit/Delete Post 
It's so funny to read about how great the Avco once was, because now it's such a sub-par theatre. In recent memory, it seems like the last two films that actually had special engagements there were Traffic and Moulin Rouge (meaning, they opened there before anywhere else in the country). Which didn't make all that much sense to me anyways, due to how lackluster the theatre is. I wouldn't be surprised if that closes too due to how great the Century 15 is.

In terms of the Crest, I think it's got such a great design, but it's a shame they get stuck with such bad programming. Just recently they played the bomb Akeelah and the Bee for weeks and weeks, even though nobody was going to see it. It seems like every other week there's a film shoot there too-- it must be how they stay in business (the ubiquitous paper bag moviefone commercial was shot there).

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Mark Campbell
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Posts: 437
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: Oct 2004


 - posted June 17, 2006 09:36 AM      Profile for Mark Campbell   Email Mark Campbell         Edit/Delete Post 
The Crest just got move-overs Over the Hedge and MI III from the Avco and Village respectively. It seems they used to get a decent first run mix from Disney and 20th, changing movies every 2 weeks. But now all the Disney fare seems to refault to the Landmark Regent (a shame, because for a while the Regent was playing great art-house fare in Westwood Village).

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Brad Erickson
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From: West Hollywood, CA
Registered: May 2006


 - posted June 19, 2006 04:58 PM      Profile for Brad Erickson   Email Brad Erickson         Edit/Delete Post 
FROM ALLBUSINESS.COM

BOTTOM OF THE PARAGRAPH INDICATES REGENT ENTERTAINMENT COULD BE INTERESTED IN TAKING OVER THE NATIONAL LEASE.

Marked Mann: Theater chain won't renew National lease.
Los Angeles Business Journal: Feb 6, 2006 issue

Author(s):
Riley-Katz, Anne


Mann Theaters will not renew its lease on the landmark Mann National Theatre, continuing its exodus from Westwood.
The National, the last single-screen theater built in Los Angeles, was the site of numerous glitzy film premieres since its opening in 1970.
After exiting the National, Mann will be left with only three one-screen theaters: the Village, Bruin and the smaller Festival theater.

"The lease is coming to an end, and they were looking to raise the rent," said Mann Theaters Chief Executive Peter Dobson. "We just can't afford the money they want."
Simms Commercial Development, which manages the property, declined comment.

The Mann chain, co-owned by Viacom Inc.'s Paramount Studios and Time Warner Inc.'s Warner Bros., will exit in August from the 1,107-seat venue. Mann previously abandoned the four-screen Westwood Theatre complex in 2001, which was replaced with a Whole Foods Market, and subsequently left the Regent and Plaza theaters.

"At one point, Mann controlled all 10 screens in Westwood Village proper," said Steve Sann, a longtime Westwood business owner, real estate consultant and partner in the Nine Thirty Restaurant at Westwood's W Hotel.
The first premiere at the theater was in 1970, when "The Boys in the Band" bowed. Since then, it's been the site of scores of high-profile Hollywood film debuts, including "The Exorcist," "Indiana Jones" and "Spider-Man."
Westwood was once dominated by large, single-screen theaters. But the advent of stadium-seating cineplexes and competition from the ArcLight in Hollywood, Century Theaters' new 15-screen flagship operation in Century City and The Bridge all cut into attendance.

Mann executives had hoped to keep the classic picture palace. "We looked at renovating the theater or turning it into four screens and none of the business models worked," Dobson said.

One plan discussed in 2004 called for Mann to be the anchor tenant of a five-screen theater project in a $60 million, mixed-use development on Broxton and Le Conte avenues. That project, however, recently stalled when the development partners filed lawsuits against each other. The reported price of renovating the National at the time was about $5 million.
Overhauling the National could be expensive due to required seismic and Americans with Disabilities Act upgrades, asbestos removal and other improvements. Parking and traffic concerns and lack of retail appeal also have made Westwood less appealing to theatergoers.

Sources said one potential tenant would be Westwood-based Regent Entertainment, which occupies the penthouse floor of the KB Homes building at Wilshire Boulevard and Veteran Avenue. Regent is the world's largest independent distributor of television movies and owns the gay TV network, here! Regent also owns boutique theaters, including the Regent Showcase at La Brea and Melrose avenues.

Regent co-founder Paul Colichman declined comment on the property or its leasing status, but offered his view on what it will take to lure viewers back to Westwood screens.
"It's a competitive theater environment, and Westwood, which is a phenomenal area in terms of location, will have to provide reasons for people to return," Colichman said. "There has to be lots of free parking, more and better restaurants, and more and better retail businesses to support the local population."
Anne Riley-Katz Staff Reporter

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Geoff Jones
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From: Novato, CA
Registered: Nov 2006


 - posted December 02, 2006 10:13 AM      Profile for Geoff Jones   Author's Homepage           Edit/Delete Post 
The main house at the Continental in Denver boasts a D-150 screen 78' wide by 35' tall. The "biggest" films usually play there and they ran a great revival series of past hits on Wed PM & Sat AM in 2006.

According to CinemaTreasures.com, the Grand Palace auditorium at Ontario Palace 22 is "only" 70', putting the Continental at the top of the list (based soley on this thread).

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Chris Utley
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From: Torrance, CA
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 - posted December 02, 2006 03:29 PM      Profile for Chris Utley   Author's Homepage   Email Chris Utley         Edit/Delete Post 
It's been common knowledge for years that the Grand Palace screen is indeed 85 feet wide. The Hollywood and the Chinese are probably 70 footers. That info at Cinema Treasures was obviously compiled by a disgruntled moviegoer. Anyone who has ever seen a film in any of those auds would not dare call them "unthemed and regular".

Here's a picture & stats of the Grand Palace (in the middle of the page).

I've seen pics of the Continental. Pretty nice. The Cinerama Dome & Seattle Cinerama are still bigger, though.

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David Au
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From: Walnut Creek, CA
Registered: Sep 2006


 - posted December 02, 2006 10:51 PM      Profile for David Au   Email David Au         Edit/Delete Post 
If Edwards Ontario Palace has bigger screens, why doesn't everyone go to Edwards instead of the AMC next door?

It looks like both theaters play just about the same movies.

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Geoff Jones
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From: Novato, CA
Registered: Nov 2006


 - posted December 02, 2006 11:10 PM      Profile for Geoff Jones   Author's Homepage           Edit/Delete Post 
Fair enough- I'll gladly trust you about the Grand Palace. I'm excited to hear about it and will try to visit. (Sadly Fandango doesn't specify the big screen. Hopefully the newspapers do?)

According to the Arclight's website, however, the Dome is a foot bigger. And as Dan mentioned, the 90' Seattle Cinerama screen is only used for the occasional Cinerama show. For the most part, if you go to see a movie there, you're going to see it on the 68' screen. (Sources linked below.)

1) 86' Arclight Cinerama Dome
2) 85' Ontario Palace "Grand Palace"
3) 78' Continental
4) 70' (Tie) Ontario Palace/ Big Newport/ others
5) 68' Seattle Cinerama

A solid list of awesome theatres. Any others this size still in operation?

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Dan Roben
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Posts: 155
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: May 2003


 - posted December 03, 2006 02:54 AM      Profile for Dan Roben           Edit/Delete Post 
This is a great thread, but leave it to me to throw a wrench into it!

When push comes to shove, screen size is more or less irrelevant. What matters is the size of the screen in relation to the size of the theater.

I can't vouch for the Grand Palace, which appears to be truly grand (I think I'll visit this theater next time I'm in SoCal), but I have been to the the Dome, Big Newport, Continental, and of course the Seattle Cinerama. Even though the Cinerama has the smallest "regular" screen of these three, the theater is also substantially smaller, thereby making the screen appear much larger.

I believe my theory even works in the case of the Arclight Dome. Even though that screen is much larger than the Seattle Cinerama's, I believe its size is somewhat diminished because of the dome itself, i.e. that theater has more spacial volume than Seattle's.

I've only been to the Dome once and that was a few years ago, so my reasoning may be somewhat on shaky ground. Perhaps Chris can comment. He has recently visited the Seattle Cinerama and he might be able to disprove me.

I do not in any way denigrate these theaters. They are all wonderful and those of us who live near them are very fortunate. Kudos to Regal for leaving the Big Newport and Continental Theaters alone. I'm sure the bean counters there drool at the opportunity to split them up, but so far...

Also to Chris, on another thread (and this was a while ago), you wondered why the Seattle Cinerama doesn't use the big screen for all films, like the Dome does. It's because of the extreme curvature of the Seattle screen. The Dome's screen has a 120 degree curvature, while Seattle's is 148 degrees. It is extremely difficult (actually impossible) to focus a scope film for a screen that deep (the left and right sides of the screen are very much out of focus while the center is in focus) which is why the Cinerama process used three projectors to show each strip of the film straight ahead, if you will, thus keeping each strip in focus.

Another phenomenon with the 148 degree curvature is that projected light bounces off one side and reflects on the other, like a mirror. This is why Seattle uses a louvered screen, 2000 strips hanging from the ceiling instead of a solid screen. This forces the reflected light to be dispersed towards the theater and not the other side of the screen.

In the old Seattle Cinerama days (before Paul Allen) when the huge screen was used all the time and it was a single sheet screen, that theater had the most bizzare masking for scope films, which I won't even try to explain here. Suffice to say that it made for some strange viewing. I actually sought out other theaters to see scope for that reason.

All of the above explanation does not pertain to 70MM which uses a special lens to correct the focus problem.

But I digress...

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Geoff Jones
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From: Novato, CA
Registered: Nov 2006


 - posted December 03, 2006 09:14 AM      Profile for Geoff Jones   Author's Homepage           Edit/Delete Post 
I wouldn't go so far as to say that screen size is irrelevant. A giant screen overwhelms you, pulls you out of your world and into a fantasy.

Anecdotally, I remember seeing A Perfect World (1993) in the first house on the left at UA Greenwood Village in Colorado. As always, I sat close enough for the screen to fill my field of vision. I was distracted throughought the film by all the small holes (screen perforations) in the picture. [Smile]

I do take your point, of course. Theatre layout, slope, sightlines, auditorium size, seat choice, screen curvature and other factors all have an impact on percieved screen size, and overall presentation quality.

But I still love having a thread cataloging the biggest screens in operation.

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