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» Cinematour Forum   » Cinema Yak   » 1.85:1 ratio films out of frame

   
Author Topic: 1.85:1 ratio films out of frame
Tom Mundell
Member

Posts: 93
From: Silver Spring, MD
Registered: Nov 2003


 - posted April 18, 2006 12:13 PM      Profile for Tom Mundell   Author's Homepage   Email Tom Mundell         Edit/Delete Post 
One of the negative side effects of AMC having taken over General Cinema is now the theatres very frequently thread the film out of frame; often the projectionist notices this and corrects the problem, but still too often getting up and complaining is necessary. Strangely it seems to happen significantly more often with flat films versus scope. It could of course just be a stunning coincidence that most scope shows I've been to were started in frame, but having not worked in the booth at all I was curious if it is really that much harder to thread a flat film in frame?

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Dave Felthous
Member

Posts: 186
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted April 18, 2006 02:50 PM      Profile for Dave Felthous   Email Dave Felthous         Edit/Delete Post 
Tom, scope and flat should make no difference in threading. Some operators neglect to change lenses between the two formats. But even that shouldn't affect proper framing, although where I used to work some of the projectors had loose framing knobs and scope tended to wander a bit from side to side. A good operator would keep an eye on this.

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Bill Gabel
Member

Posts: 288
From: New York, NY
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted April 18, 2006 05:48 PM      Profile for Bill Gabel           Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
A good operator would keep an eye on this.
It's all in the training of the operators. Since many theatres that AMC has taken over from GCC and Loews are operated with the kids now. Many of the former union GCC and Loews houses have got limited service.
When I worked in Los Angeles, I was sent to a Mann Theatre (6-plex) to work and re-train the kids in the booth. The union projectionist that had been there did not give a crap and they picked up all his bad habits. The first week I watched every booth operator tread and start shows and handle film. With his bad habits and theirs, I had my job cutout for me. By the second week the booth ran like a clock.

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David Wodeyla
Member

Posts: 65
From: Natick, MA
Registered: Jun 2004


 - posted April 18, 2006 08:32 PM      Profile for David Wodeyla   Author's Homepage   Email David Wodeyla         Edit/Delete Post 
After these last three posts, does anyone wonder why exhibition is in trouble?

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Dave Felthous
Member

Posts: 186
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted April 18, 2006 09:13 PM      Profile for Dave Felthous   Email Dave Felthous         Edit/Delete Post 
David, you're right. I now work at a single-screen, neighborhood, first-run house, and there are never projection problems because the booth guys keep an eye on things. After five years in a hectic multiplex I really appreciate the concern for quality presentation. We have DTS but no Dolby digital or SDDS, and it sounds wonderful. (It helps to have a great auditorium with good accoustical properties.)

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Christopher Crouch
Member

Posts: 292
From: Anaheim, CA
Registered: Feb 2006


 - posted April 19, 2006 01:02 AM      Profile for Christopher Crouch   Email Christopher Crouch         Edit/Delete Post 
Sadly, I feel this sort of poor quality is a growing issue, across the board, for far too many of today's theatres. From staff members, to projectionists, and straight through to management, I've noted the training and overall quality of theatre workers declining greatly over the past decade or so (especially with the big chains). Where once there was an effort to develope long term, quality employees, the focus now seems to be "what's the minimum we can get by with?" (aka how can we keep payroll down?). In turn, we end up with a revolving door of mediocre workers and theatre going experiences like the one that started this thread.

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Bill Gabel
Member

Posts: 288
From: New York, NY
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted April 19, 2006 12:58 PM      Profile for Bill Gabel           Edit/Delete Post 
The problem I have here in NYC is that many of the Loews theatres in the city. Burn their bulbs to the point that they flicker and need to be replaced. I've been to 5 different theatres and I seem to get the flickering auditoriums. With the AMC take-over of the Loews houses, the union operator's hours has been reduced to around 25 a week and the rest of the time is covered by booth kids. I've been told that the operators at the AMC Empire 25 Theatre think AMC is the greatest. Just wait till their hours get cut.

Not bad for paying $10.75 a ticket here. [LOL]

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Tom Mundell
Member

Posts: 93
From: Silver Spring, MD
Registered: Nov 2003


 - posted April 20, 2006 06:41 AM      Profile for Tom Mundell   Author's Homepage   Email Tom Mundell         Edit/Delete Post 
Thanks Dave, that's kinda what I expected but wasn't sure.

Most of the Loew's Theaters I've been to are so bad I was hoping AMC could improve those theaters at least a little bit; doubt it, but it's tough to imagine getting worse.

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