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» Cinematour Forum   » Cinema Yak   » 70mm (Page 1)

 
This topic comprises 2 pages: 1  2 
 
Author Topic: 70mm
Jack Coursey
New Member

Posts: 34
From: Nashville, TN
Registered: Jan 2005


 - posted July 14, 2005 04:08 PM      Profile for Jack Coursey   Email Jack Coursey         Edit/Delete Post 
I couldn’t help but notice that none of the big releases so far this year have been offered in 70mm. I know the move is on to digital, but films like War of the Worlds, Batman Begins and whatever the latest install of the Star War series was called are ideal for this type of format. Some of the newer megaplexs have at least one auditorium with a huge screen that is prime for showing 70mm. Heck, they could be shown in the IMAX theatres during the evenings instead of the standard fare of 45-minute documentaries on subjects like the existential leaning of insects. Granted a few of these major films are being shown in the IMAX halls, but with 35mm projection, giving the film a washed out look.

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Chris Utley
Senior Member

Posts: 631
From: Torrance, CA
Registered: May 2003


 - posted July 15, 2005 10:22 AM      Profile for Chris Utley   Author's Homepage   Email Chris Utley         Edit/Delete Post 
Actually, Batman Begins had a set of prints specfically for IMAX. No washed out 35MM imagery there! I don't think any Spielberg films have had IMAX prints. Star Wars Episode 2 had an IMAX run shortly after release, but Lucas passed up on Episode 3 because he's getting the 3-D versions of all 6 films ready.

Regarding 70MM, I don't know the details but I thought I heard that 70MM prints are too costly to strike. Also, DTS is the only digital sound format that's 70MM compatible. What I do know is that your average multiplex ain't the most opportune environment to experience 70MM projection. With very few exceptions, most new auditoriums are merely shoeboxes with stadium seating.

[ July 17, 2005, 02:22 PM: Message edited by: Chris Utley ]

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Jack Coursey
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Posts: 34
From: Nashville, TN
Registered: Jan 2005


 - posted July 15, 2005 09:06 PM      Profile for Jack Coursey   Email Jack Coursey         Edit/Delete Post 
Augh! You’ve confirmed my fear! Well, what the heck… Isn’t there a digital equivalent to70mm? And what is this 3-D process you speak of? Is Lucas gonna actually go back and put the whole Star Wars series in that cheesy 50s format?

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Dave Felthous
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Posts: 186
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted July 15, 2005 10:19 PM      Profile for Dave Felthous   Email Dave Felthous         Edit/Delete Post 
I work at a suburban multiplex; we have two large auditoriums that had 70-mm equipment, but it's been years since 70-mm films were made available to us. We would get 35-mm prints of major films that were available in 70-mm; 70-mm prints are very expensive and the few that were struck for each movie went to major venues, not to the suburbs. During a major remodel last year we removed the 70-mm rollers from our projectors because they made threading 35-mm more difficult and caused film to come off track.

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Chris Utley
Senior Member

Posts: 631
From: Torrance, CA
Registered: May 2003


 - posted July 17, 2005 02:23 PM      Profile for Chris Utley   Author's Homepage   Email Chris Utley         Edit/Delete Post 
I'm surprised you didn't know this since the news broke months ago. There's a new form of 3D (not the paper blue and red lenses) that's being spearheaded by James Cameron and George Lucas. Lucas is going to re-release all 6 SW films in this new 3D format starting in 2007.

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David Wodeyla
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Posts: 65
From: Natick, MA
Registered: Jun 2004


 - posted July 17, 2005 05:18 PM      Profile for David Wodeyla   Author's Homepage   Email David Wodeyla         Edit/Delete Post 
The "new 3D" isn't really new, but I guess not everyone has been to Disney World. Here in Natick, we get to see that same excellent 3D at the Jordan's IMAX. I think Polaroid developed the process.

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Ron Newman
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Posts: 145
From: Somerville, MA
Registered: Jan 2005


 - posted July 17, 2005 09:15 PM      Profile for Ron Newman   Email Ron Newman         Edit/Delete Post 
IMAX may have a new 3-D process, but polarized 3-D is anything but new. "Dial M for Murder" was released in polarized 3-D in ... 1954!

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George Gates
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Posts: 55
From: Providence, RI
Registered: May 2005


 - posted July 18, 2005 08:17 AM      Profile for George Gates           Edit/Delete Post 
I wonder if the "new 3D" is the same as I saw at Epcot about 5 years ago? There's also a Muppet movie at MGM in 3D, and the Animal Kingdom has an excellent 3D movie.

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Chris Utley
Senior Member

Posts: 631
From: Torrance, CA
Registered: May 2003


 - posted July 18, 2005 09:31 AM      Profile for Chris Utley   Author's Homepage   Email Chris Utley         Edit/Delete Post 
My bad. According to the article concerning the re-releases, this isn't "new 3D" at all. It's, rather, a way to revive 3-D combined with digital cinema.

BTW...to kinda get back on topic...digital cinema allegedly isn't 70MM compatible, either. When the whole digital cinema craze took off with SW Episode 1, I asked that question at a Q&A following a digital cinema screening of the film.

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Ron Newman
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Posts: 145
From: Somerville, MA
Registered: Jan 2005


 - posted July 18, 2005 10:10 AM      Profile for Ron Newman   Email Ron Newman         Edit/Delete Post 
I don't understand. If the film wasn't shot in 3-D to begin with -- using two cameras -- how can it be made into 3-D later?

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Chris Utley
Senior Member

Posts: 631
From: Torrance, CA
Registered: May 2003


 - posted July 18, 2005 10:48 AM      Profile for Chris Utley   Author's Homepage   Email Chris Utley         Edit/Delete Post 
Somehow...someway...they found a way, I guess.

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Jim Perry
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Posts: 13
From: Las Vegas, NV
Registered: Jun 2004


 - posted July 18, 2005 07:46 PM      Profile for Jim Perry   Email Jim Perry         Edit/Delete Post 
In regards to Chris Utley's comment about the 70mm cost factor: the main reason why these prints were so expensive was due to applying the 6 mag tracks onto the film. On the other hand, a 70mm print with DTS timecode, I believe, costs much less to create - maybe a bit more than your 35mm print (due to the width).
Just an observation:
It still boggles my mind as to why the studios / business all but abandoned the format after the advent of the digital sound systems back in the early '90s. While DTS should be commended for applying their system to 70mm, I'm surprised that both Dolby & Sony haven't
bothered to do so - ESPECIALLY SONY !!!!
Their SDDS system is capable of playing back 8 CHANNELS of sound, as opposed to 6 from the others. Talk about a missed opportunity here.

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Chris Utley
Senior Member

Posts: 631
From: Torrance, CA
Registered: May 2003


 - posted July 19, 2005 09:41 AM      Profile for Chris Utley   Author's Homepage   Email Chris Utley         Edit/Delete Post 
But...as I inquired earlier...how many of today's theatres are TRULY EQUIPPED to handle a 70MM presentation? The few theatres with IMAX auditoriums could do the job, but not your average stadium-in-a-box.

I'm lucky to (still) live in an area where there are still enough super-sized auditoriums to handle the demands of 70MM. But what about the rest of us?

BTW...SDDS STINKS!!! I stopped going to AMC's because of their insistance upon an SDDS only digital sound format...and the fact that SDDS (at least in my experience) goes on the blink on a regular basis. I've experienced more than my fair share of nasty SDDS presentations where the system goes haywire and reverts from digital to analog and back again for the whole 2 hour running time!

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Tom Mundell
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Posts: 93
From: Silver Spring, MD
Registered: Nov 2003


 - posted July 19, 2005 10:17 AM      Profile for Tom Mundell   Author's Homepage   Email Tom Mundell         Edit/Delete Post 
I'd blame that particular AMC more than SDDS, which I think sounds great (especially in 8 channel mode) if the theatre maintains their equipment and prints. They probably couldn't do much better with Dolby if they have that many problems with SDDS (I've heard SDDS have problems in some less than top notch theatres, but Dolby Digital at the same locations had just as many problems. DTS seems to do better at surviving sketchy conditions than the other formats, I haven't experienced any terribly aweful issues with that format...)

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Chris Utley
Senior Member

Posts: 631
From: Torrance, CA
Registered: May 2003


 - posted July 19, 2005 01:30 PM      Profile for Chris Utley   Author's Homepage   Email Chris Utley         Edit/Delete Post 
I've had that experience at almost every AMC I've gone to! The final straw was having to sit through an entire analog stereo presentation of "The Sum Of All Fears" during the summer of 02 at the AMC Downtown Disney 12 -- which, at the time, was AMC's newest theatre! I even complained to corporate and got the brush-off for being a "film geek".

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