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» Cinematour Forum   » Cinema Yak   » speaker floats

   
Author Topic: speaker floats
Tom Mundell
Member

Posts: 93
From: Silver Spring, MD
Registered: Nov 2003


 - posted July 27, 2004 11:08 AM      Profile for Tom Mundell   Author's Homepage   Email Tom Mundell         Edit/Delete Post 
I recently came across this site for
speaker floats. Seeing as how I live on the second floor in a rather small appartment, I would love to better isolate my stereo from neighbors. Any thoughts on whether this idea works or is completely bogus?

My main left/right speakers already have spikes that they stand on, so this probably wouldn't work with those, but as my surrounds rest directly against a wall perhaps it wouldn't hurt.

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Mike Olpin
New Member

Posts: 34
From: Spring Valley, CA
Registered: Nov 2003


 - posted July 27, 2004 05:08 PM      Profile for Mike Olpin   Author's Homepage   Email Mike Olpin         Edit/Delete Post 
I always use little rubber feet such as the one on that site. They help reduce unwanted vibration from whatever surface the speakers are on.

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Jim Rankin
(Jim passed away in December 2006)
Posts: 123
From: Milwaukee, WI
Registered: Oct 2003


 - posted July 28, 2004 06:03 AM      Profile for Jim Rankin   Email Jim Rankin         Edit/Delete Post 
Tom, the 'floats' or similar padded feet will help somewhat, but don't kid yourself: sound pressure will also be transmitted right through the walls and other surfaces if the volume is high enough. Even a little transistor radio can produce enough volume for others in adjoining spaces to hear it, so a stereo requires LOTS of heavy walls/floors/ceilings to stop TRANSMITTED sound (as opposed to REFLECTED sound). Consult any book on Acoustics at a library and it will show that only MASS stops sound proportionate to the amplitude (strength/loudness) of the sound waves striking it. Typical plaster walls built before the second world war will muffle LOW volume levels, but most places since then are built of dry wall (gypsum) and that light material does not have the mass to stop much sound at all. As you can imagine, sound-deadening your room could be very difficult and expensive for a stereo, so probably your best bet is to use quality headphones if you really want to 'keep the peace.' Good headphones will even give better sound than expensive speakers since they don't have to fight the acoustics and can give much greater fidelity at lower power levels. Radio Shack has phones that are tied by Radio Frequency or infrared rays to a transmitter you connect to the speaker terminals on your stereo, and this way you never have a cord to tangle you. Such a thing can also be used with your TV. Look for it at http://www.radioshack.com/category.asp?catalog%5Fname=CTLG&category%5Fname=CTLG%5F007%5F003%5F006%5F000&Page=1 Best Wishes.

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Tom Mundell
Member

Posts: 93
From: Silver Spring, MD
Registered: Nov 2003


 - posted July 28, 2004 06:19 AM      Profile for Tom Mundell   Author's Homepage   Email Tom Mundell         Edit/Delete Post 
Thanks, that's what I expected. The one drawback to headphones is for material that's in more than two channels (movies, dvd-audio, etc), though I seem to recall Dolby or someone having a pair of surround sound headphones (don't know if that works or not...)

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Mike Olpin
New Member

Posts: 34
From: Spring Valley, CA
Registered: Nov 2003


 - posted July 28, 2004 10:53 AM      Profile for Mike Olpin   Author's Homepage   Email Mike Olpin         Edit/Delete Post 
Dolby Headphone enables any stereo headset to play multi-channel dolby and dolby ex tracks. It decodes the existing channels, and re-encodes them in binaural stereo format. The result is that you can distinguish space (forward, backward, left, right, etc) in your regular heaphones. Think of it as 3D headphones.

You will need to get yourself a home theatre reciever that supports Dolby Headphone. No additional equiptment is required to play some DVDs, including "Pearl Harbor", which allready offer a seperate audio track with Dolby Headphone built in.

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Tom Mundell
Member

Posts: 93
From: Silver Spring, MD
Registered: Nov 2003


 - posted October 20, 2004 02:16 PM      Profile for Tom Mundell   Author's Homepage   Email Tom Mundell         Edit/Delete Post 
Well, I got a chance to try these out and the results were actually much better than I expected! As Jim noted, it's not perfect; some sound is still audible in adjacent rooms, but it actually does decrease quite a bit. The most noticable improvement I had was with bass; one of my test songs had a significant amount of muddy bass sound that could be heard in other rooms, and this managed eliminate almost all of it. (most of my comparisons I did at a pretty loud volume level; turned down to what I typically listen to results were even better of course).

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