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» Cinematour Forum   » Cinema Yak   » what's your favorite type of theatre? (Page 5)

 
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Author Topic: what's your favorite type of theatre?
Chris Utley
Senior Member

Posts: 631
From: Torrance, CA
Registered: May 2003


 - posted July 11, 2005 04:07 PM      Profile for Chris Utley   Author's Homepage   Email Chris Utley         Edit/Delete Post 
I visited NYC in June and stayed in the middle of Times Square. Found the Ziegfeld with no problems. Enjoyed my visit too...even though the screen is too small for a place of that magnitude.

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George Gates
Member

Posts: 55
From: Providence, RI
Registered: May 2005


 - posted July 12, 2005 08:40 AM      Profile for George Gates           Edit/Delete Post 
I stayed in the middle of Times Square a few months ago too. I went to the Zeigfeld and thought the staff was a bit standoff-ish, but hesitate to bring it up here, as it might be considered "off topic". What type of theatre would you say the Zeigfeld is? And of course, what is your favourite type?

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George Gates
Member

Posts: 55
From: Providence, RI
Registered: May 2005


 - posted July 14, 2005 06:21 AM      Profile for George Gates           Edit/Delete Post 
I also went on the tour of the Radio City Music Hall. I thought the giant wall painting looked as though it had faded from the cleaning it went through on the restoration. That deco style movie palace is probably my favorite type of theatre. I can imagine what it would have been like seeing King Kong ( the original) playing there in 1932. I hope mentioning King Kong in this post doesn't put the comment off-topic. [Wink]

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Mark Campbell
Member

Posts: 437
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: Oct 2004


 - posted January 18, 2006 10:52 AM      Profile for Mark Campbell   Email Mark Campbell         Edit/Delete Post 
My favorite type of theatre depends on what I am seeing.

For big Hollywood movies I like large Cinerama-style theatres of the 60's and 70's, preferably if they have been upgraded with modern sound and conveniences:
Mann National, Westwood
Cinerama Dome, Hollywood
Seattle Cinerama
Southcenter Theatre (demolished) Tukwilla, WA
Tacoma Mall Twin (demolished) Tacoma, WA
UA 150 (demolished) Seattle, WA
or some decent large THX multiplex auditoriums from the '80's, prior to any stadium retrofitting:
Crossroads, Bellevue, WA
Alderwood Cinemas, Lynnwood WA
Lloyd Center, Portland OR

For Foreign or Independent movies I prefer older, well maintained theatres:
Laemmle Royal, Los Angeles
Guild 45th, Seattle
Harvard Exit, Seattle

For my own amusement I love looking at bad splits from the 60's and 70's. Think GCC. I also am a fan of the old GCC style. The only theare chain that seemed to have a consistent identity, not matter how bad they split their theatre. I will visit these theatres if they exist merely to see the theatre, not to see a movie I care about.

I am bored to tears by any modern stadium multiplex (except perhaps the Arclight in Hollywood), especially when the masking retracts vertically for scope. This means the picture will be way to big for flat! Plus, many of these theatre set limits on size if they don't want to build elevators for the handicapped. Unfortunately, I think we are stuck with them.

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Fred Einsle
New Member

Posts: 7
From: Naperville, IL
Registered: Mar 2006


 - posted March 22, 2006 09:07 PM      Profile for Fred Einsle   Email Fred Einsle         Edit/Delete Post 
My favorite surviving theater is Classic Cinema's Tivoli Theater, Downers Grove, Illinois.
http://www.classiccinemas.com/amenities03.asp

Single screen - modernized with current day seats, HPS 4000 Digital Sound, still has a organ, 2nd run movies only $3.00 still even on weekends when the organ is played.

Used to be up until about the first new Batman movie that they showed some movies in 70mm, only $2.00 back then around 1988 or so, though at that time was before it was restored, and had an ugly orange theme for it's colors.

Could not understand how they paint, complete with gold leaf (don't know if any real gold in it?) but, they have extensive detail and I would think you would paint say a leaf at a time. Somehow they did painting in a straight line over the detail (a computer that paints with real paint (not true, but looked like it).

Plaque states second theater in the USA designed for talking pictures.

odd to some who post here I actually like the AMC 30 nearby, though I like when it is not overcrowded and the best to me are the small curved screens with digital sound.

Hollywood Theater - dinner and show, unique idea, but don't like being served during the actual movie, wide choice of seat types - office type on wheels seemed best for eating, and movie watching. Been there only one time.

http://www.cinematour.com/tour/us/6440.html

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Mark Campbell
Member

Posts: 437
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: Oct 2004


 - posted March 22, 2006 11:20 PM      Profile for Mark Campbell   Email Mark Campbell         Edit/Delete Post 
That Hollywood Theatre is an old '80's GCC if I've ever seen one!

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Jonathan Smith
New Member

Posts: 6
From: San Diego, CA
Registered: May 2006


 - posted June 14, 2006 09:20 AM      Profile for Jonathan Smith   Email Jonathan Smith         Edit/Delete Post 
A couple weeks ago, I vacationed in L.A. for a few days, I finally got to go to the Arclight(although I didn't have time to get to The Dome, which I will do next time). It was definitely worth it, definitely the best multiplex in Southern California, and definitely one of the Top 5 in the country. I saw Brick and The Break-Up at the arclight, both were presented excellently, with big screens, great sound and double wide armrests for perfect relaxation. and the funny thing was, after I saw The Break-Up... I noticed Keanu Reeves was in the lobby, he was busy talking to some people, so I waved at him, and I think he waved back.

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Roger Chinnici
New Member

Posts: 11
From: Rock Hill, MO
Registered: Apr 2008


 - posted April 05, 2008 08:49 PM      Profile for Roger Chinnici   Email Roger Chinnici         Edit/Delete Post 
To be brief....I believe the loss of single screen theaters to the bi's, tri's, quads, quints, etc. was the downfall of the glorious industry I once knew. It's very sad but very true.

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Matt Lutthans
Member

Posts: 51
From: Marysville, WA
Registered: Dec 2003


 - posted April 06, 2008 04:15 PM      Profile for Matt Lutthans   Email Matt Lutthans         Edit/Delete Post 
Mark Campbell and I appear to have pretty similar tastes. My favorite type of theatre would probably be built in the 1962 to 1974 time frame, i.e., BIG screens, usually curved, built for Cinerama, D150, 70mm, etc. Like mark, I absolutely lament the loss of the UA-150 and Southcenter in the Seattle. Now, I tend to aim for Crossroads big room. The Cinerama downtown isn't such a thrill since they typically don't use the curved screen and the new screen is TOO CLOSE to the front, and I like to sit up front.

I've also spent many hours in the Landmark houses around Seattle. I especially like Neptune with its quirky balcony of death, and the main room at the Varsity. It's a bit out of the way, but I also like the North Bend Theatre, the Roxy in Eatonville, and the Lincoln in Mt. Vernon. The Chehalis is also a great single-screener.

When a new megaplex opens up, I have zero interest. They are just sterile boxes, IMHO.

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Roger Chinnici
New Member

Posts: 11
From: Rock Hill, MO
Registered: Apr 2008


 - posted April 09, 2008 07:55 AM      Profile for Roger Chinnici   Email Roger Chinnici         Edit/Delete Post 
I will always prefer the single screen movie house. The epitome of which, in my opinion, is The FOX Theater in St. Louis, Missouri. It's extensive renovations and TLC saved this structure from, the almost certain, wrecking ball some 30 odd years ago. Losing it would have been criminal, in my opinion.

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Scott D. Neff
Tour Guide

Posts: 661
From: San Francisco, CA
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted April 12, 2008 10:48 AM      Profile for Scott D. Neff   Email Scott D. Neff         Edit/Delete Post 
In doing a lot of newspaper research I further narrowed down my favorite type of theatre just simply by seeing pictures of theatres in their grand opening ads.

Apparently I get unreasonably excited by most theatres, usually "State of the Art TWIN Theatres!" that were built between 1966-1972.

Like the General Cinema I-II's, the UA 150's and Loew's. The only reason I can figure I like these is because these buildings were the start of the suburban multiplex. I so so enjoy how these singles and twins were made to survive by being chopped up into awful mutations, most of which seemed like arbitrary corporate decisions. Add a wall here, put a hallway here and whammo, 3-plex!

Don't get me wrong, I enjoy the big box theatres of the time as well, but there's just some sort of irony I enjoy about the 60's theatres.

One of the most recent discoveries of the type, sitting shuttered outside a mall in New York.
South Shore Cinema - Bay Shore, NY

At the same time, for almost the exact same reasons I enjoy theatres from around the same time that were built to mimic in their own modern way, the splendor and glory of downtown movie palaces. Places like The Northgate - Seattle, WA or the domes that Syufy built like Century 21 - San Jose, CA. Places like this seemed to really be trying to be different, and then after a few year the corporations realized they didn't have to be fancy and started plopping down the type of theatre mentioned above.

Rest assured though, if you're ever on a trip with me and I see one of those late 60's theatres, you'll see me foaming at the mouth.

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Dan Roben
Member

Posts: 155
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: May 2003


 - posted April 12, 2008 01:03 PM      Profile for Dan Roben           Edit/Delete Post 
And Scott, let's not forget GCC's feeble attempt to somehow elevate themselves from the competition by proudly proclaiming in their opening ads that they had an art gallery in the lobby! The "art", as I recall, was nothing more than what you would find in a "starving artists" sale commonly held in suburban hotel ballrooms.

Surprisingly, I haven't weighed in on this discussion, so here goes. I echo Scott's and Mark's comments in that I love the builds of the 60s and 70s. I'm also a huge fan of single screen theaters. Luckily, Seattle still has a fair amount of singles (more than most other cities its size) and I try to patronize them as much as possible.

My favorites in Seattle include: AMC's Cinerama, Landmark's Egyptian, Neptune, Harvard Exit, Guild 45th (okay, I cheated a little on those last two...the Harvard and Guild are both 'twin' theaters but act like singles. The Harvard's two theaters are on the first and third floor of an early '20s building, and the Guild's two theaters are in separate buildings with a restaurant between them).

Then there are the independents...The Edmonds Theater, Columbia City Cinema, SIFF Cinema and the two Big Pictures in Seattle and Redmond.

All of these theaters are unlike each other and offer something different from the "move 'em in, get 'em out" megaplex experience.

For multiple screen venues, I like the independent Majestic Bay (3 theaters); AMC's Uptown 3 and Oak Tree 6, Regal's Alderwood 7, Crossroads 8, Mountlake 9 (endangered); and Landmark's Crest (4 theaters).

For a positive megaplex experience, I'll go to the independently owned Lincoln Square 16 in Bellevue. Not only is it well designed and comfortable, but they manage to personalize the experience by having a manager introduce many of the screenings. Now if only they had installed side masking...

The other numerous megaplexes bore me and I choose not to spend my hard-earned dollars at them.

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Brad Erickson
Member

Posts: 117
From: West Hollywood, CA
Registered: May 2006


 - posted May 28, 2008 05:16 PM      Profile for Brad Erickson   Email Brad Erickson         Edit/Delete Post 
Any single screen Theatre that is still standing I patronize. The Village, Bruin, Chinese, and late National and Picwood in L.A. were/are favorites. The now gone Plitt Century Plaza were 2 huge twin theatres.

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Bob Allen
Member

Posts: 79
From: Toledo, OR
Registered: May 2003


 - posted August 01, 2009 05:36 PM      Profile for Bob Allen   Email Bob Allen         Edit/Delete Post 
I realize I'm more that a year late for this one but, what the heck, I'm retired and have plenty of time. My favorite is art-deco, single screen, changeover houses with carbon arcs and stage curtains. However, I don't know where I'll find one these days.

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Scott D. Neff
Tour Guide

Posts: 661
From: San Francisco, CA
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted August 05, 2009 12:20 PM      Profile for Scott D. Neff   Email Scott D. Neff         Edit/Delete Post 
Happy to see people posting, a year late or not. Ya never know what bumping a thread up will do. [Smile]

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