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» Cinematour Forum   » Cinema Yak   » what's your favorite type of theatre? (Page 3)

 
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Author Topic: what's your favorite type of theatre?
Adam Martin
Administrator

Posts: 1090
From: Dallas, TX
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted April 26, 2003 06:22 PM      Profile for Adam Martin   Author's Homepage   Email Adam Martin         Edit/Delete Post 
The Quad 6 in San Jose was originally a four-plex. There was also a Quad 6 in Grand Rapids, MI.

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Daniel Fuentz
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Posts: 212
From: Cleveland, Ohio
Registered: Mar 2003


 - posted April 26, 2003 06:41 PM      Profile for Daniel Fuentz   Email Daniel Fuentz         Edit/Delete Post 
Oh, I know, that was my (lame) attempt at humor... There must've been a reason why they didn't drop the "Quad" part of the name when they expanded to 6 screens.

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Dan Wright
New Member

Posts: 23
From: Yakima, WA
Registered: Apr 2003


 - posted April 26, 2003 07:06 PM      Profile for Dan Wright   Email Dan Wright         Edit/Delete Post 
Well if the name was Meridian Quad changeing the sign, letterheads, and everything else would have been simpler if they just tacked 6 on the end of it. Looking at those photos the whole place just looks grungy, cluttered and poorly put together. more like whoever did the work had no pride or care in what they were doing. The twos on the wall look like sheet metal or plastic so they must have had some plan in mind when they did it. I just cant get over the total lack of any kind of sound deadening. Plain brick walls It must have sounded awful in there

[ April 26, 2003, 09:51 PM: Message edited by: Dan Wright ]

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Daniel Fuentz
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Posts: 212
From: Cleveland, Ohio
Registered: Mar 2003


 - posted April 26, 2003 10:40 PM      Profile for Daniel Fuentz   Email Daniel Fuentz         Edit/Delete Post 
The captions on the pictures of this theater over at Film-Tech are quite amusing. (Same pictures, just with captions) They make mention of the lack of sound deadening material, "to maintain those perfect 1970's acoustics".

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Chuck Cook
Member

Posts: 66
From: Kentwood, MI
Registered: Apr 2003


 - posted April 26, 2003 11:29 PM      Profile for Chuck Cook   Email Chuck Cook         Edit/Delete Post 
Hey, I live maybe only a mile from where the Quad 6 used to be! It's been torn down and is now a car dealership.

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Eric Hooper
Member

Posts: 107
From: Santa Clara, CA
Registered: Apr 2003


 - posted April 27, 2003 10:37 AM      Profile for Eric Hooper   Email Eric Hooper         Edit/Delete Post 
Oh please please please if anybody has pictures of the GCC Southland 5 or GCC Hillsdale 4 or GCC Fashion Island 6 PLEASE POST THEM. I basically 'lived' at the Southland and Hillsdale theatres. General Cinema even recruited me as a 'mystery shopper' in 1997, and because I did such a good job, they had me reviewing these two theatres twice a month. The Southland theatre was HUGE! Two very large auditoriums, one medium size, and then two smaller ones. The two large auditoriums used to be one giant one, and the three other auditoriums were one giant one. It was very neat the way they set up the three smaller auditoriums. The two small ones were first, closest to the lobby, and then a hallway down between both of them into the medium size. At the end of the hallway you either went left or right and entered right into the medium size auditorium. There were no doors...the hallway just opened up into the auditorium...Way cool. The Hillsdale was one giant theatre, and they split it evenly into four boxes. But we still got wierd viewing angles and isles in strange places. The Hillsdale has since been torn down, but Southland is still standing there vacant. Maybe I can call the management office of Southland Mall and ask them if I can tour the vacant theatre and take photos!!! I will try.

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Scott D. Neff
Tour Guide

Posts: 661
From: San Francisco, CA
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted April 27, 2003 10:49 AM      Profile for Scott D. Neff   Email Scott D. Neff         Edit/Delete Post 
RE: Tje MQ6. That was built and run by Blumenfeld Enterprises, a theatre company that owned and managed many theatres throughout the Bay Area and even Sacramento over the past 50 years. They were a very large name and took GREAT pride in their theatres.

They owned many of the single screen theatres in San Francisco, and even took the effort to restore the Alhambra Theatre in San Francisco into a single screen after they had already twinned it in the 70's. All of their locations were union operated and had great equipment. The Royal, Regency I, Regency II and Alhambra were the bulk of their theatres that closed in San Francisco shortly after the AMC 14 (1000 Van Ness) was built. They were operating the MQ6 and the Castro as their last two theatres and when they closed the MQ6 I suppose they cut bait by returning the Castro Theatre back to the landlord who currently operates it.

I think the MQ6 was probably an EXCELLENT theatre when it was built and probably just as good throughout the early 80's. But when the "Old Man" died, as with other theatre chains, his successors didn't have the same love of theatres and therefore didn't invest in keeping things competitive.

I would love, and I SHOULD contact the Blumenfelds and see if they have any photographs they would donate to Cinematour so we could have record of them. They owned/operated a LOT of theatres. Off the top of my head:

Alhambra - San Francisco (Fitness Center)
Royal - San Francisco (closed)
Regency I - San Francisco (concerts etc)
Regency II - San Francisco (closed)
Regency III - San Francisco (now Ruby Skye)
Castro - San Francisco (open)
Marin - Sausalito (the original single, Century operates the 3-plex)
Sequoia - Mill Valley (Century operates)
Lark - Larkspur
Tamalpais - San Anselmo (facade exist, back end is offices)
Fairfax - Fairfax (Cinema West operates)
Rafael - San Rafael (Mill Valley Film Festival operates)
Montecito - San Rafael (Trader Joe's)
Northgate I - San Rafael (demolished)
Ignacio - Ignacio/Novato (karate studios)
101 Drive-In - San Rafael (now the Regency 6, Century operates)
Marin Motor Movies - San Rafael (now Marin Square shoppint center)
Tower - Sacramento (now a Reading Theatre)

and there's MANY MANY more in Sacramento that I don't recall off the top of my head.

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Paul Linfesty
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Posts: 64
From: Bakersfield, CA
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted April 27, 2003 11:04 AM      Profile for Paul Linfesty   Email Paul Linfesty         Edit/Delete Post 
I was at GCC's Southland Center in Hayward when it was just the two large theatres (NASHVILLE in 1975). It had those so-called art galleries in the lobby, those corrugated silver metal walls, contrast-killer shadow boxes, flickering and dim images, two sections of seats, 14 on each side of a middle aisle, with two additional aisles running down the side walls (3 asiles in all), pushback seats, doors that slammed LOUD when they closed. Yep! A GREAT moviegoing experience! (It didnt help that I had seen NASHVILLE a few weeks earlier at the beautiful Northpoint in SF, in 4-track mag, no less!

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Eric Hooper
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Posts: 107
From: Santa Clara, CA
Registered: Apr 2003


 - posted April 27, 2003 12:11 PM      Profile for Eric Hooper   Email Eric Hooper         Edit/Delete Post 
Paul, does this look familiar...

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(picture from The Motion-Picture Projection and Theatre Presentation Manual). From what you're describing you must have been in the auditorium that got split into three theatres. This picture accurately depicts how the two large auditoriums would have looked as one giant theatre, based on the isles. Yes, they just put a wall down the center of it, and put new screens. Actually it looked very similar to the new pictures posted of the Stonestown theatre in San Francisco. In this picuture, ahh yes, you can see those GCC grey metallic walls and metal seats. Those remained after 5-plexing the Southland, until 1990 when they redid the theatre with the new comfy blue GCC seats and painted the metallic walls dark red. It was actually very nice!! And yes, I remember the art gallery boards in the lobby... Those were around until about 1986.

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Paul Linfesty
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Posts: 64
From: Bakersfield, CA
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted April 27, 2003 02:18 PM      Profile for Paul Linfesty   Email Paul Linfesty         Edit/Delete Post 
Yep. Only difference is the auditorium I was in was somewhat smaller (this shows a center section and two side sections). I remember they used blue screen warmers). I can't remember WHY we went here instead of SF to see NASHVILLE (I was living in Berkeley at the time). Probably because they charged 1.25 (or so) for a bargain show and the Northpoint was 3.50 all day. Oh, well, I got to see a new type of theatre design for me, anyways).

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Daniel Fuentz
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From: Cleveland, Ohio
Registered: Mar 2003


 - posted April 27, 2003 02:32 PM      Profile for Daniel Fuentz   Email Daniel Fuentz         Edit/Delete Post 
So that's what you're referring to when you mention a GCC "Shadowbox" screen! It certainly is... unique!

Scott, I didn't mean to be harsh on the MQ6, rather I found those huge numbers to be rather distinctive of the 1970's and was trying a lame attempt at humor... (It wasn't just the large numbers themselves -- the thing that got me was how they are reversed on the opposite wall. I know, it was supposed to be a mirror image, but I thought it looked funny.) Personally, I find the 70's decor rather interesting -- too bad I don't have any lobby pictures of the UA Northgate. As you could see when you were in town, the place has been gutted and there is not a trace of the orange and plaid carpet, wood-grain formica, or white painted walls with bits of wood nailed to them.

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Paul Linfesty
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Posts: 64
From: Bakersfield, CA
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted April 27, 2003 03:14 PM      Profile for Paul Linfesty   Email Paul Linfesty         Edit/Delete Post 
When UA opened its first complex in town (1979) it was a new design that had live trees growing in the lobby from dirt holes in the ground. Because of the heat locally, skylights that were used at the UA Warner Center in Woodland Hills weren't used here. BAD idea. The trees were always dying and eventually they were tiled up. This was an incredibly cheap build. The ceiling was the bottom of the roof. When it rained, buckets were placed around the theatres. Not a very pleasent experience.

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Bob Allen
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Posts: 79
From: Toledo, OR
Registered: May 2003


 - posted May 01, 2003 12:50 PM      Profile for Bob Allen   Email Bob Allen         Edit/Delete Post 
I'm with you Scott. I like single screen theatres from the 30s, 40s and 50s especially art-decco. I'm working on picking up dark houses in rural and small town areas with the hope of up-dating the sound and seating to serve what is now an underserved area of our country.

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Richard A Stegman Jr
Member

Posts: 267
From: Calimesa,CA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted June 19, 2003 09:05 AM      Profile for Richard A Stegman Jr   Email Richard A Stegman Jr         Edit/Delete Post 
As a boy growing up in the 1970's,i had a few experiences with single screen movie theatres.

In Hollywood,There was the Cinerama Dome,(Where i saw "Logan's Run" in an early form of 70mm Dolby Stereo)The Paramount,(i saw "Murder by Death" there,it's now the El Capitan)The Holly,(R.I.P).

There was also The Meralta in Downey California,(which had a sister theatre in Culver City and where i would go to see Disney movies. I also a double bill of "Silver Streak" & "Phantom of the Paradise" there),the Avenue which was right next door,(saw "Dog Day Afternoon" & "The Happy Hooker" there. no,my folks weren't discriminating when it came to what i saw.)

My first multiplex memory was the California 3 in Huntington Park,which was down the street from my elementary school. Hated going up the balcony of the main auditorium. way too dark.

Don't remember architecture of these theatres though. Some were ordinary,some were gorgeous. that's all i can say,i guess. [Smile]

Rich

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Mike Law
Member

Posts: 60
From: Sacramento, CA
Registered: Jul 2003


 - posted July 17, 2003 10:04 PM      Profile for Mike Law   Email Mike Law         Edit/Delete Post 
Well Guys...
I'd like to introduce myself; I'm Mike Law, the new kid on the block, from Sacramento, California. I was fortunate enough to be a Union Projectionist here in Sacto from 1976 to 1985. I worked thirty-something theatres during my heyday, but the biggest thrill in my opinion was a single screen theatre WITH A FULL HOUSE. My wife, two kids, and I saw "The Wizard of Oz" last December at the Paramount in Oakland. There wasn't an empty seat in the house. The entire audience cheered when water was thrown on the wicked witch in the final reel. "I'M MELTING, I'M MELTING!!! I still get goosebumps over that one. We're all entitled to our opinions, but a full house in a single-screen theatre... that's worth my price of admission.

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