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» Cinematour Forum   » Cinematour Discussion   » Remodeled Cinemas

   
Author Topic: Remodeled Cinemas
Jack Coursey
New Member

Posts: 34
From: Nashville, TN
Registered: Jan 2005


 - posted January 03, 2010 05:16 PM      Profile for Jack Coursey   Email Jack Coursey         Edit/Delete Post 
I have a macabre interest in single screen cinemas which have been sliced and diced to accommodate two or more screens. Of particular interest are those in which patrons must travel through a labyrinth in order to get to their point of destination. The Tara Theatre in Atlanta has a rather interesting configuration.

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Jeff Arellano
Senior Member

Posts: 685
From: Monterey Park, CA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted January 04, 2010 09:52 AM      Profile for Jeff Arellano   Email Jeff Arellano         Edit/Delete Post 
The Academy in Pasadena is one of only a few in Southern California still operating as a multiplex out of a single screen.

It has 6 screens, 2 upstairs out of the balcony, and 4 out of the main screen, 2 up front and 2 in the back half.

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Scott D. Neff
Tour Guide

Posts: 661
From: San Francisco, CA
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted January 04, 2010 09:55 AM      Profile for Scott D. Neff   Email Scott D. Neff         Edit/Delete Post 
I've always liked these as well. The UA 7 in Berkeley is carved out of an old single. Balcony split in half, main floor split in three, a small auditorium built in both lower and upper lobbies and then another in the old backstage. I wish I could get in there to get decent pictures.

A lot of Classic Cinemas theatres are interesting too, not overly chopped but old singles that have been added onto over the years which now sprawl down the entire block.

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Roger Katz
Member

Posts: 339
From: Thomaston, CT
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted January 06, 2010 05:20 PM      Profile for Roger Katz   Email Roger Katz         Edit/Delete Post 
The American Theatre in Bronx, NY and the Parkade Cinemas in Manchester, CT are ones that I've been in that have gone from single screen to 6+ screens by adding/chopping/building mazes, etc. The Parkade was pretty spooky to be in back when it was abandoned and I snuck in and never knew what the next hallway would lead me to.

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Edward Havens
New Member

Posts: 50
From: Walnut Creek, CA
Registered: Oct 2009


 - posted January 08, 2010 11:45 AM      Profile for Edward Havens   Email Edward Havens         Edit/Delete Post 
The Del Mar in Santa Cruz, the first theatre I was an assistant manager at, was converted from 1 to 4 screens in 1978. Walled off the balcony, and stuck a wall down the middle of both the balcony and the main floor. After UATC bailed on the Del Mar in the late 1990s, the owner of the Nickelodeon down the street picked it up and spent a pretty penny to take the wall out of the main floor, so now it's a three screener. You can visit thenick.com to see on the front page how beautiful the main auditorium is.

Another theatre I was a manager at, the Fox Theatre in Watsonville CA, was also converted from 1 to 3 screens by walling off the balcony and sticking a wall down the middle.

The Cinema Village in New York City was converted from 1 to 3 screens in 2000. The theatre itself was created from the shell of a turn-of-the-century fire station.

The Village East in New York City went from 1 to 7 screens, but the original auditorium, to the best of my knowledge, was left alone. Instead, six smaller houses have been erected around and under the main screen.

The Kabuki in San Francisco, though, is my favorite remodeled theatre. An authentic Kabuki theatre was built in the heart of Japantown and somehow was a complete failure, so AMC altered the live theatre to play movies while keeping as much of the original theatre aesthetics intact as possible, and then building seven additional screens next to the main house. Sundance Cinemas took it over in 2006, and I haven't been there since. Maybe something good will be there when I visit the town next month.

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Bill Gabel
Member

Posts: 288
From: New York, NY
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted January 08, 2010 04:27 PM      Profile for Bill Gabel           Edit/Delete Post 
The former Warner Theatre on Hollywood Blvd. became the Hollywood Pacific triplex in 1978. (main house 1200 and two 500 houses in the former balcony)

Culver Theatre (Culver City) became a triplex.
California Theatre (Huntington Park) became a triplex.
Granada Theatre (Santa Barbara) became a triplex 7 returned to a single.
Highland Theatre (Los Angeles-Highland Park) became a triplex.
Wilshire Theatre (Santa Monica) became a twin.
Golden Gate Theatre (San Francisco) became a twin.
Alexandria Theatre (San Francisco) became a triplex.
St. Francis Theatre (San Francisco) became a twin.
Embassy 2,3,4 Theatre (NYC-Times Square) became a triplex.
Warner Theatre (NYC-Times Square) became a triplex.
State Theatre (NYC-Times Square) became a twin.
Criterion Theatre (NYC-Times Square) became a 6 plex.
National Theatre (NYC-Times Square) became a twin & almost a triplex.
Rivoli Theatre (NYC-Times Square) became a twin.
Loew's Jersey City became a triplex.
Loew's Metropolitan (NYC-Brooklyn) became a Quad.
Coliseum Theatre (NYC) became a Quad.

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Christopher Crouch
Member

Posts: 292
From: Anaheim, CA
Registered: Feb 2006


 - posted January 09, 2010 02:18 AM      Profile for Christopher Crouch   Email Christopher Crouch         Edit/Delete Post 
The Brookhurst Theatre (Anaheim,Ca.) has a slightly unusual "plexing" configuration. The formerly decent single auditorium was cut up in to four screens, with a cross shaped access hallway. Two auditoriums are entered directly off of the lobby, but they have screen side exits that open up on to the entrances to the other two auditoriums (talk about movie hopping issue). This second pair of auditoriums are accessed down the steeply graded hallway (what was once the center of the single screen auditorium). Due to being the former front of the single auditorium, the rear auditoriums slope upwards, rather than the tradition downwards slope. Equally unusual, there is a zigzag catwalk, above the center hallway, that links the two projection booths (everyone knows when the projectionist moves from one booth to the other, due to the catwalk's flimsy plywood construction).

The, sadly razed, Cinemaland (Anaheim, Ca.) had one of the worst divisions I've encountered. Kind of a T shape, with two auditoriums divided in a somewhat tradition fashion, a third acccessed down a long side hallway (former side of auditorium) and positioned horizontally.

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Bill Gabel
Member

Posts: 288
From: New York, NY
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted January 11, 2010 07:58 AM      Profile for Bill Gabel           Edit/Delete Post 
And add the Music Hall in Beverly Hill into a triplex and Fairfax Theatre into a triplex also.

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Bob Allen
Member

Posts: 79
From: Toledo, OR
Registered: May 2003


 - posted January 11, 2010 11:30 AM      Profile for Bob Allen   Email Bob Allen         Edit/Delete Post 
Bill:

How in the world do you get around so much? I see you are in NY but apparently have been out here on the west coast. Have you seen the Fox Pomona since they restored it. What a beautiful house. I wish I could get down there to see it. I grew up there and served my apprenticehip as an IA operator there back in '49 when it was one of Pomona's first-run houses. (The UA, now a Mexican church was the other.)

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Richard A Stegman Jr
Member

Posts: 267
From: Calimesa,CA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted January 12, 2010 07:28 AM      Profile for Richard A Stegman Jr   Email Richard A Stegman Jr         Edit/Delete Post 
The Fox(Now Fox Cineplex)in Banning,California was a Fox West Coast single that became a twin when National General,later Mann,took over. carving the auditorium in half.

When they closed it('76?),it was closed until the mid '80s when local operators took over. they would later add a smaller screening room,to show move overs from the twin,behind it.

It was "Remodeled" again late last year with middling results.(uncomfortable seats,men's restroom with a still too narrow handicapped toilet. The marquee and lobby look good though.)

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Bill Gabel
Member

Posts: 288
From: New York, NY
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted January 12, 2010 08:56 AM      Profile for Bill Gabel           Edit/Delete Post 
Hi Bob, No I have not gotten to see the restored Fox Pomona yet. Last time I saw the Fox was in the early 90's. I was based in Los Angeles and worked the extra board for Local-150, before doing studio production. I worked many of the theatres in the Los Angeles market. Now I am based now in NYC.

Add to the list the Warner Huntington Park Theatre which became a twin. Main theatre downstairs and a theatre in the former balcony.
Fox Riverside Theatre kept the main theatre, but converted the stage house area into another screen. Which ran adult films as a Pussycat Theatre at one time.

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Jack Coursey
New Member

Posts: 34
From: Nashville, TN
Registered: Jan 2005


 - posted January 20, 2010 07:18 PM      Profile for Jack Coursey   Email Jack Coursey         Edit/Delete Post 
I will agree that the slice and dice work performed on both the Brookhurst and Cinemaland among the best of the worse. Former cineramas are very difficult to reconfigure without gutting the entire auditorium.

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