CinemaTour
Cinema History Around the World
 HOME ·· CINEMAS ·· FORUM ·· LINKS ·· BOOKS
 Contact Cinematour ·· Help & Hints ·· About Cinematour
Cinematour Forum


  
my profile | my password | search | faq | forum home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Cinematour Forum   » Cinemas and Theatres   » Regal Tikahtnu Commons 16 & IMAX

   
Author Topic: Regal Tikahtnu Commons 16 & IMAX
Keith Hoffmann
New Member

Posts: 1
From: Idaho Falls, ID
Registered: Sep 2009


 - posted September 16, 2009 03:00 PM      Profile for Keith Hoffmann   Email Keith Hoffmann         Edit/Delete Post 
I was reading an article about Regal's new theatre in Anchorage and the article stated:
"...we understand that they are using this theater as a prototype for new theaters nationwide."

The story also mentioned an "enhanced food court"

Any thoughts on what will be so different/special about this new build, or what they are suggesting by an enhanced food court?

Link to article:
http://www.akbizmag.com/alaska-news/218-construction-begins-on-tikahtnu-commons-new-regal-theater.html

 |  IP: Logged

David Au
Member

Posts: 133
From: Walnut Creek, CA
Registered: Sep 2006


 - posted September 16, 2009 08:04 PM      Profile for David Au   Email David Au         Edit/Delete Post 
They constantly hype new theaters as the latest prototype. Based on Regal's past experiments, it will probably be a disappointment.

Movie theater patrons want huge screens, huge sound, great customer service, and good food. However, Regal has given us multiplexes with tons of tiny screens and bad sound.

If Regal wants to create a movie theater revolution they should go back to giant screens with side masking and high quality sound. They should also improve customer service. Customers need to be made happy if a business wants to survive.

The enhanced food court might refer to more food choices at the concession stand. Some National Amusement theaters serve burgers, fries, pizza, etc. Cineplex in Canada serves Burger King, Pizza Hut, KFC, Wetzel's Pretzels, and more. Concession stands are where most of the money is made for theaters.

Many people go out to eat and then stop by the movie theater. Having more food choices makes a movie theater a one stop entertainment destination.

 |  IP: Logged

Jerry Norwood
New Member

Posts: 43
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: Jun 2008


 - posted December 01, 2009 02:00 PM      Profile for Jerry Norwood   Email Jerry Norwood         Edit/Delete Post 
If you see pictures of Regal's L.A. Live Stadium 14, I doubt you would say their new designs is a disappointment.

Check it out:
http://blogdowntown.com/2009/10/4801-regal-cinemas-at-la-live-opening-tuesday

 |  IP: Logged

Chris Utley
Senior Member

Posts: 631
From: Torrance, CA
Registered: May 2003


 - posted December 03, 2009 09:00 AM      Profile for Chris Utley   Author's Homepage   Email Chris Utley         Edit/Delete Post 
You obviously have never seen a movie there. 1 ginormous auditorium and 13 "one size fits all" shoeboxes with top masking IN ALL THEATRES! [barf]

Who goes to a theatre because it looks pretty on the outside? We've said it before, we'll say it again - PRESENTATION is the key!

 |  IP: Logged

Scott D. Neff
Tour Guide

Posts: 661
From: San Francisco, CA
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted December 03, 2009 09:46 AM      Profile for Scott D. Neff   Email Scott D. Neff         Edit/Delete Post 
I swear if I hear one more complaint about top masking imma scream. Get over it!!!

I totally understand the complaint, but because an auditorium has top masking is unfortunate not disasterous. Yes the scope image gets smaller, but why not look at the flip side... the flat image is bigger. This way, you get more bang for your flat image instead of more bang for your scope images.

 |  IP: Logged

Bob Allen
Member

Posts: 79
From: Toledo, OR
Registered: May 2003


 - posted December 03, 2009 12:25 PM      Profile for Bob Allen   Email Bob Allen         Edit/Delete Post 
Well Scott, I agree with Chris. When 'scope first came out (before you were even a gleam in your father's eye) it was as high and three times wider than flat images. To allow your flat image to be bigger than your 'scope image destroys the 'scope effect.

 |  IP: Logged

Scott D. Neff
Tour Guide

Posts: 661
From: San Francisco, CA
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted December 04, 2009 08:21 AM      Profile for Scott D. Neff   Email Scott D. Neff         Edit/Delete Post 
I grew up going to theatres with side masking. I do prefer side masking. But to avoid theatres that have top masking is just silly. Silly I say!

 |  IP: Logged

Chris Utley
Senior Member

Posts: 631
From: Torrance, CA
Registered: May 2003


 - posted December 04, 2009 11:23 AM      Profile for Chris Utley   Author's Homepage   Email Chris Utley         Edit/Delete Post 
Much to Scott's delight, the rest of America is already over it. Regal is cannibalizing screens with their one size fits all P.O.S'es from coast to coast. Thankfully I live in the film capital of the world where we DO have a CHOICE to dismiss this spoon-fed, bottom feeding lack of showmanship from the Regals, Cinemarks and AMC's that are destroying the true art of cinematic presentation.

 |  IP: Logged

Bob Allen
Member

Posts: 79
From: Toledo, OR
Registered: May 2003


 - posted December 04, 2009 04:31 PM      Profile for Bob Allen   Email Bob Allen         Edit/Delete Post 
GO Chris GO!!! That's why (lack of quality screen presentation)I no longer work for Regal or CineMark.

 |  IP: Logged

Rich Charles
New Member

Posts: 6
From: St. Anthony, ID
Registered: Oct 2009


 - posted December 04, 2009 07:49 PM      Profile for Rich Charles   Email Rich Charles         Edit/Delete Post 
Chris you mention you are lucky to live in an area with options, but maybe that is very telling. There may be the demographic in L.A. that merits spot on, perfect scope screen size theatre, but the reality is across the country the demand is not there. If people were attentive to such things the major companies would be delivering, and the fact they are not proves my point, the everyday movie-goer just doesn't care "that much" about screen size.

 |  IP: Logged

Richard A Stegman Jr
Member

Posts: 267
From: Calimesa,CA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted December 04, 2009 11:13 PM      Profile for Richard A Stegman Jr   Email Richard A Stegman Jr         Edit/Delete Post 
I know i asked before but how do i tell when a screen goes from regular flat to scope? I think i need a refresher in "Screen Masking 101" when it comes to all this top/bottom/side masking business.

 |  IP: Logged

David Au
Member

Posts: 133
From: Walnut Creek, CA
Registered: Sep 2006


 - posted December 05, 2009 04:29 AM      Profile for David Au   Email David Au         Edit/Delete Post 
Usually the commercials and pre-show at Regal, AMC, and Cinemark are in flat mode. Once the pre-show is over, the screen either stretches to the right and left to become scope (widescreen). This is for side masking theaters where the scope picture is wider and bigger than flat.

For a top down masking screen, after the pre-show the screen shrinks to the scope format. This is accomplished by a black curtain(masking) sliding down from the top of the screen blocking off part of the screen. The scope picture is smaller than the flat picture in this case since part of the screen is blocked by the masking.

Some theaters use top and bottom masking. The screen is biggest in flat mode and then shrinks for scope by using masking at the top and bottom. This is the case on all new AMC theaters. Prior to 2000, AMC used right and left side masking on most of their biggest screens.

 |  IP: Logged

Bob Allen
Member

Posts: 79
From: Toledo, OR
Registered: May 2003


 - posted December 05, 2009 04:52 PM      Profile for Bob Allen   Email Bob Allen         Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
Usually the commercials and pre-show at Regal, AMC, and Cinemark are in flat mode. Once the pre-show is over, the screen either stretches to the right and left to become scope (widescreen). This is for side masking theaters where the scope picture is wider and bigger than flat.

For a top down masking screen, after the pre-show the screen shrinks to the scope format. This is accomplished by a black curtain(masking) sliding down from the top of the screen blocking off part of the screen. The scope picture is smaller than the flat picture in this case since part of the screen is blocked by the masking.

Some theaters use top and bottom masking. The screen is biggest in flat mode and then shrinks for scope by using masking at the top and bottom. This is the case on all new AMC theaters. Prior to 2000, AMC used right and left side masking on most of their biggest screens.

The fact that many theatres shoot a 'scope picture that is smaller than flat is IMO cheating the public. When 'scope (CinemaScope) came out it was two and one-third times wider than it was tall. It was shot in a 2:35 x 1 ratio. Most common "flat" ratio at the time was 1:33 x 1. Then came 1:66 x 1 and 1:85 x 1 (which is still being used and called "wide screen"). Multiplexes trim the "scope picture so they can squeeze in more auditoriums and single-screeners do it because they usually have a stage arch that would have to be remodeled and they apparently can't afford it or don't want to spend the money. In both cases I believe they have lost the concept of "showmanship and I'm sure the directors of 'scope pictures are annoyed by this. As for the public not demanding 'scope be shown in it's proper aspect ratio and size: how can they demand something they don't know exists?

 |  IP: Logged

Chris Utley
Senior Member

Posts: 631
From: Torrance, CA
Registered: May 2003


 - posted December 07, 2009 09:19 AM      Profile for Chris Utley   Author's Homepage   Email Chris Utley         Edit/Delete Post 
The public doesn't know any better anymore. Heck, the public has been indoctrinated into believing that it's better to skip the movie theatre altogether and watch a Saturday night flick on their 52 inch LCD HDTV.

Although, if you live in a city full of nothing but Regal & Cinemark multiplexes, I can understand that logic. Your TV has a slightly bigger picture than their screens and your home theatre probably puts out better sound. [Rolling on Floor Laughing]

 |  IP: Logged



All times are Central  
   Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic    next oldest topic   next newest topic
Hop To:

© 1995-2013 Vision Entertainment Services. All rights reserved.

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.3.1.2