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» Cinematour Forum   » Cinemas and Theatres   » AMC Southcenter

   
Author Topic: AMC Southcenter
William Newman
Member

Posts: 61
From: Everett, WA
Registered: May 2004


 - posted June 12, 2008 05:39 PM      Profile for William Newman   Email William Newman         Edit/Delete Post 
Lately, there is a signage of New AMC Theatre sign at New Theatre Complex at Westfield Southercenter. Sometime this summer be open.

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Mark Campbell
Member

Posts: 437
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: Oct 2004


 - posted June 16, 2008 09:06 PM      Profile for Mark Campbell   Email Mark Campbell         Edit/Delete Post 
I wonder what the would mean for the AMC (ex-GCC) Renton Village 8 two miles east. Regal has an Act III build, the Parkway Plaza Stadium 12, less than a mile south of Southcenter. It plays day and date with Renton Village. Regal also has another Act III build the East Valley 13 about 2 miles East of Southcenter and Parkway Plaza and 1 mile South of the Renton Village 8. It plays day and date with Parkway Plaza and did with the old Southcenter theatre before it was demolished, but not with Renton Village.

AMC can either keep Renton Village 8 open to take some of the business away from the Regal's East Valley 13 (if Renton closes East Valley would get any film it wanted) but canibalize its own new Southcenter theatre, or close it and just hope that the new theatre would be enough of a a draw to get people away from East Valley.

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Dan Roben
Member

Posts: 155
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: May 2003


 - posted June 16, 2008 10:24 PM      Profile for Dan Roben           Edit/Delete Post 
The AMC Renton Village is living on borrowed time. The new AMC Southcenter will draw patrons away, but another closer threat is the new Regal being built in a new "mixed-use" complex close to downtown Renton. I believe Regal's East Valley 13 and Parkway Plaza 12 Cinemas are safe for the time being.

It's possible that AMC will run the Renton Village as a bargain house, but that only means delaying the inevitable.

The sad part about all this is that the closing of the Renton Village means that only two former GCC plexes will still be operating in the greater Puget Sound market, the un-GCC like Pacific Place 11 and the classic late 80s Kitsap Mall 8 in Silverdale. Pac Place is safe (it's extremely popular), but it wouldn't surprise me if AMC has designs in expanding their presence in the fast-growing Bremerton-Silverdale market.

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Mark Campbell
Member

Posts: 437
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: Oct 2004


 - posted June 16, 2008 11:03 PM      Profile for Mark Campbell   Email Mark Campbell         Edit/Delete Post 
Dan, 1 more GCC in Puget Sound: The Starplex Gateway 8 in Federal Way now operating as a discount house.

Had no idea about Regal Cinemas at Renton's "The Landing". That would kill off the Renton Village as a 1st run for sure. I can't imagine AMC turning Renton into a discount house as they are so few and far between these days. But it might be the perfect location for an operator like Starplex or Regency to pop in...

Guess I better visit the AMC Renton Village 8 soon. Just went to the AMC (Loews/Cineplex Odeon/SRO) Factoria 8 on a pilgrimage (SRO nostalgia) and it seemed like it was waiting to have the plug pulled. But there was a decent midweek matinee crowd there...

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Dave Felthous
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Posts: 186
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted June 17, 2008 09:17 AM      Profile for Dave Felthous   Email Dave Felthous         Edit/Delete Post 
Regal built the Parkway Plaza 12, not Act III.

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Mark Campbell
Member

Posts: 437
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: Oct 2004


 - posted June 17, 2008 09:26 AM      Profile for Mark Campbell   Email Mark Campbell         Edit/Delete Post 
Dave, was it an Act III design but executed or followed through by Regal? It certainly has all Act III design cues as opposed to the Longston 14 or Tall Firs 10 which scream Regal.

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Dan Roben
Member

Posts: 155
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: May 2003


 - posted June 17, 2008 06:52 PM      Profile for Dan Roben           Edit/Delete Post 
Forgot about the Gateway...shame on me, being a GCC booster of the first order!

The Parkway 12 is definitely an Act III design. Whether it opened as a Regal or Act III, I can't remember so I'll defer to Dave. Act III was in a big expansion phase when they sold out to Regal and it makes sense that Regal utilized Act III's designs.

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Jerry Norwood
New Member

Posts: 43
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: Jun 2008


 - posted June 26, 2008 10:55 AM      Profile for Jerry Norwood   Email Jerry Norwood         Edit/Delete Post 
I use to be the General Manager of Parkway Plaza Stadium 12. Here are the facts about one of my favorite theaters that I ran...and 1 of 3 that I was a GM for that was an ACT III design. It was an ACT III design from WPH Architecture...it was known as Tukwila 12 during it's construction. Regal bought ACT III Theatres during it's conception. Parkway Plaza Stadium 12 will surely be impacted like Lincoln Square 16 impacted Bellevue Galleria Stadium 11. I don't see Regal getting rid of the Parkway though. AMC Southcenter 16 with IMAX will be all digital. It's going to be a tough fight. The current GM told me that she has already seen a decrease in attendance due to the opening of AMC Kent Station 14. It will be interesting to see what kind of impact Regal's The Landing Stadium 14 will also have on Southcenter 16 because The Landing Stadium 14 will be all digital too. Parkway, Southcenter, The Landing, and East Valley are all within a close radius. My opinion, too many theaters too close to each other.

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Mark Campbell
Member

Posts: 437
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: Oct 2004


 - posted June 26, 2008 11:33 AM      Profile for Mark Campbell   Email Mark Campbell         Edit/Delete Post 
Jerry it does indeed seem that the north end of the Kent/Auburn valley ending in Renton in the north is WAY overscreened with the East Valley 13, Renton Village 8, and Parkway Plaza 12 all within a couple miles of each other. And is not including the 7 screen Lewis and Clark and the single screen Southcenter that both closed a few years back.What was one booking zone now seems like 2: East and West. The new AMC and the new Regal will make it even worse unless something gets knocked out. And will the new Regal at the Landing play date and date with the Eat Valley 13? That would make 3 zones!

It is odd this area is overscreened where other area of Puget Sound are lacking: North Seattle, West Tacoma (but not Lakewood in South Tacoma).

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Jerry Norwood
New Member

Posts: 43
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: Jun 2008


 - posted June 26, 2008 11:44 AM      Profile for Jerry Norwood   Email Jerry Norwood         Edit/Delete Post 
I am thinking that The Landing will have to split product with AMC Renton Village 8 since it is technically in a competitive zone. The studios usually set a zone standard of 5 miles. I don't expect Renton Village to last long as it will be swamped by fairly new and really new stadium complexes. This will be interesting to watch. Tukwila-Renton-Kent area is the second seriously oversecreened area in the Pacific Northwest to my knowledge outside Portland, OR. Portland's overscreened areas include the Wilsonville Stadium 9 - Bridgeport Village Stadium 18 - Sherwood Stadium 10 - Tigard 11 area.

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William Newman
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Posts: 61
From: Everett, WA
Registered: May 2004


 - posted July 18, 2008 10:27 AM      Profile for William Newman   Email William Newman         Edit/Delete Post 
In yesterday Tacoma News Tresbune, new AMC Westfield Southcenter will open on July 25th. Also, include IMAX screen and 90' tall.

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Dan Roben
Member

Posts: 155
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: May 2003


 - posted July 18, 2008 09:34 PM      Profile for Dan Roben           Edit/Delete Post 
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/business/371181_digitalmovie18.html

AMC opening Northwest's first all-digital cineplex at Southcenter

By WILLIAM ARNOLD
P-I MOVIE CRITIC

It's not being billed as such, but the opening Friday of AMC's luxurious 16-screen multiplex at Westfield Southcenter in Tukwila is a milestone event in local movie history. It's the first large-scale cinema in the Northwest in which every projector is digital.

The 2,900-seat complex is one of 10 nonfilm theaters AMC is introducing into the hard-pressed movie market this year, and the prototype for a movie-theater future that industry experts predict could be all-digital in less than a decade.

Will this transition affect the average moviegoer?

Not really. The visual disparity between 35 mm film and the new digital presentation is so fine these days that most people watching the two versions of "The Dark Knight" side by side would be unable to tell the difference.

What the movie patron is more likely to notice about the AMC Southcenter 16 is its deluxe layout and decor. It may just be the most lavish and awe-inspiring cathedral of moviegoing to be constructed in the Seattle area since the movie-palace era of the late 1920s.

Unlike most recent multiplexes, this new movie temple, which employs a staff of 75, is not a cookie-cutter model. It is designed to its setting, with a vast window in the reception area that, on a clear day, frames Mount Rainier to look like the Paramount logo.

Entering the lobby under a massive skylight (similar to the one at Pacific Place, only larger and more impressive), the visitor sees its own version of the Sistine Chapel ceiling: a staggering elevated mural of vintage and current movie stars in their greatest roles.

There are no footprints in the forecourt, but there are a hundred or so square feet of famous movie catchphrases cleverly embedded in the walkway for fans to mull over the same way they do the autographed tablets of Grauman's Chinese Theatre. ("They Call Me Mr. Tibbs!" "Show Me the Money," "Go Ahead, Make My Day," etc.)

After the lobby and the football field of a concession stand, every corridor is a hall of movie fame, lined with panels that pay tribute to great filmmakers (Hitchcock, Scorsese) and classic films ("Spartacus," "Psycho"). The moviegoer is immersed in Hollywood glamour from every angle.

Each auditorium is as acoustically perfect as the Cinerama, with floor-to-ceiling and wall-to-wall screens, 48-inch spacing for legroom, stadium seating giving an unobstructed view from every level and plush seats with retractable armrests that allow you to cuddle with your neighbor.

The projection booth -- where the 16 humming Sony digital projectors are arranged in a block-long semicircle -- resembles the bridge of the starship Enterprise. Computer lights blink here and there, and everything is antiseptic and automated. Gone are the clunky film cans, film reels and film-winding tables of yore.

How does it all work? The "digital print" is shipped from the studio to the theater in a small yellow container that looks like a lunch pail. Actually, the print is not a print at all but a hard drive about the size of a videotape, which is instantly downloaded into the theater's computer.

From there, the movie "information" is sent to individual projectors, which are under the easy control of one technician working at a bank of 16 screens in "command control." Everything going on in each auditorium also can be monitored by computers at AMC's home office in Kansas City, Mo.

Is the total digitizing of the moviegoing experience a good thing?

AMC's corporate communications manager, Andy DiOrio, thinks so. "Our guests tell us that they prefer digital to film," he said. "They feel it makes for an all-around better movie experience."

There's "none of the popping and scratching you see with film," none of the "degeneration that film prints suffer with repeated use," and, with no projectionist in the mix, the process allows no room for the human error that can mar a film presentation.

DiOrio says that theaters of the future have to offer people "presentation that's better than what they get at home" and digital is the ticket: The new state-of-the-art digital projectors "produce images with more than four times the resolution of HDTV."

Others, of course, are less sanguine about of this Brave New Movie World. Many filmmakers -- Steven Spielberg included -- feel that, at this stage of its development and maybe forever, digital simply can't match the richness, texture, lighting and subtle artistic potential of film.

History tells us that every movie innovation has a shadow side and has been a small step backward: Silent movies are more purely cinematic than talkies; the silver screen was no longer silver after the changeover from nitrate to safety film; and the old three-strip Technicolor is more lush than any color process that succeeded it.

Exactly what the downside to an all-digital cinema will be is hard to tell at this point, but it may be psychological. For a certain generation of moviegoers, a clear line of distinction exists between video and film. A video (or DVD) is what you watch at home; a film is what you go to a theater to see.

If that distinction no longer holds, if a theater film is no longer a film and the home-theater video experience keeps getting grander in scale and more technologically polished, what's the real difference between the two beyond the price of the popcorn? That's the question exhibitors may find increasingly difficult to answer.

P-I movie critic William Arnold can be reached at 206-448-8185 or williamarnold@seattlepi.com

Oy Vay! Where do I begin?

First, the AMC Southcenter is not the first all-digital theater in the Northwest. There are two complexes in the Puget Sound region (a 10-plex in Gig Harbor and a 12-plex in Monroe, both operated by Galaxy Cinemas) and two in the Portland/Vancouver region (Cinetopia, an 8-plex independent located in Vancouver, and the Clackamas Town Center 20 operated by Cinemark, located in the Southeastern suburbs of Portland). There may be more, but I am not aware of them. If the flacks at AMC fed Arnold this line of bull, then he bought it hook, line and sinker.

I will reserve judgement on the aesthetics of the new 'plex as I haven't been there. However, I can't let the following go by without commenting:

Quote: "Our guests tell us that they prefer digital to film," he said. "They feel it makes for an all-around better movie experience. There's none of the popping and scratching you see with film," none of the "degeneration that film prints suffer with repeated use," and, with no projectionist in the mix, the process allows no room for the human error that can mar a film presentation. (End of Quote)

It may very well be true that AMC's guests prefer digital over film, but that is only because the idea that "if it's digital, it must be better" has been drilled into gullible consumers' heads. If a 'real' film is projected properly by well-trained professional projectionists, that print will look good throughout its run. If a print goes bad, one only has to look at who is projecting it, often (but not always) a manager or one of his or her minions, trained only to get the picture onto the screen and to hell with the presentation.

Okay...rant over! [Smile]

Look for my review of the AMC Southcenter 16 soon. I'll try to be civil and fair, but like life itself, there are no guarantees.

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Ken Layton
Member

Posts: 87
From: Olympia, WA
Registered: Oct 2004


 - posted July 19, 2008 10:13 PM      Profile for Ken Layton   Email Ken Layton         Edit/Delete Post 
I've heard of many problems with the video projectors at the Galaxy 10 in Gig Harbor. People were getting refunds for screwed up shows or shows that simply wouldn't "play".

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Matt Lutthans
Member

Posts: 51
From: Marysville, WA
Registered: Dec 2003


 - posted August 23, 2011 06:13 PM      Profile for Matt Lutthans   Email Matt Lutthans         Edit/Delete Post 
Urgh. Went to the Southcenter 16 for the first time on Sunday, and it's just more of the usual garbage when it comes to picture quality. The show was in #16, one of the smaller rooms. My gripes:

•Poor digital projection. I'm no fan of digital, but I'm not a dyed-in-the-wool detractor, either. My beef is when the quality is so low that black & other dark shades get all blotchy, and curved lines become jagged and "stair-steppy." It looks like garbage - and better can be achieved, especially on a small screen like this one.

•The screen had 4 evenly-spaced vertical lines in the picture. I walked up to the screen following the show and looked carefully to see that the screen had perforations as usual, except for four 1/2" (appx) widths where there are no perfs. Those are the vertical lines that are appearing. Really annoying.

•It's a 3-D screen being used for a 2-D movie. I was sitting 3 seats off center, and half the screen reflected enough light to my eyes, while half the screen was in severe darkness. When even my wife is complaining about the picture quality, it's bad!

What a sad state of affairs....

By the way, I was recently in #2 at Bellis Fair in Bellingham, and they have the 3-D screen up there, too. Picture quality was better than at Southcenter (and on a MUCH larger screen), but the hot-spots (due to the 3-D screen) are just awful. (The movie was 2-D.)

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