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» Cinematour Forum   » Cinemas and Theatres   » Harkins Moreno Valley 16 (Page 1)

 
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Author Topic: Harkins Moreno Valley 16
Richard A Stegman Jr
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Posts: 267
From: Calimesa,CA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted June 19, 2006 10:36 AM      Profile for Richard A Stegman Jr   Email Richard A Stegman Jr         Edit/Delete Post 
Supposedly,it's due to open June 23 but i think they'll wait a week for "Superman Returns"

Anyway...does any know or can predict what the fates of the Ultrastar theatres at Towngate & Canyon Springs will be?

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Jeff Arellano
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From: Monterey Park, CA
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 - posted June 19, 2006 11:18 AM      Profile for Jeff Arellano   Email Jeff Arellano         Edit/Delete Post 
Place the last nails in the one off the 60 (not towngate).

Towngate will play day-to day or share product. They do have a digital projector there.

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Richard A Stegman Jr
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From: Calimesa,CA
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 - posted June 19, 2006 12:04 PM      Profile for Richard A Stegman Jr   Email Richard A Stegman Jr         Edit/Delete Post 
Myself,i see Towngate becoming a second run or move over theatre.

I fear you might be right about Canyon Springs though.

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Richard A Stegman Jr
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From: Calimesa,CA
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 - posted June 23, 2006 08:06 AM      Profile for Richard A Stegman Jr   Email Richard A Stegman Jr         Edit/Delete Post 
Opens Today! [thumbs up]

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Jeff Arellano
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From: Monterey Park, CA
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 - posted June 23, 2006 06:12 PM      Profile for Jeff Arellano   Email Jeff Arellano         Edit/Delete Post 
Article from the Press-Telegram:

Region Gets New Cinema Chain

Harkins Theatres is opening a 16-screen complex today at the Moreno Valley Mall

10:07 PM PDT on Thursday, June 22, 2006

By JONATHAN SHIKES
The Press-Enterprise

A long-awaited, 16-screen movie theater complex opens today at the Moreno Valley Mall, but the first person in line was determined decades ago.

Like his father before him, Dan Harkins buys the first ticket at every new theater his company builds. It's a tradition that has kept him busy recently.

Scottsdale, Ariz.-based Harkins Theatres is in the midst of an expansion that has moved the family-owned chain outside Arizona for the first time. In the past two years, it has opened theaters in Texas, Oklahoma, Colorado and now California.

"We are looking to states west of the Mississippi (River) and mostly contiguous to Arizona, and in communities that are underserved," said Harkins, company president and chief executive. "Moreno Valley is the most underserved community in the Inland Empire."

Harkins Moreno Valley 16 features high-back rocking seats, wall-to-wall screens, a digital sound system, phone and Internet ticketing, and a snack bar with hot foods like cheese sticks and french fries in addition to traditional fare. It also has a child-care center, where theater-bound parents can drop off kids, ages 3-to-8, for $6.

"They have a lot of amenities not associated with their competitors," said mall General Manager Jim Fuson. "They are going to dominate this particular area."
Carrie Rosema / The Press-Enterprise
Workers put some finishing touches on the new Harkins Theatre in Moreno Valley. The complex opens today.

There are two other theaters in Moreno Valley, both owned by Vista-based UltraStar Cinemas, which operates 102 screens at 13 sites in Southern California.

The 77,000-square-foot Harkins theater, which is attached to the mall, is expected to draw at least 1.5 million people in the next year, he added.

Damon Rubio, vice president of operations for UltraStar, said competition hurts both companies because they will have to take turns showing new movies.

To prevent one of its theaters from becoming a "discount house," Rubio said UltraStar has been experimenting with art films or other independent features. The company is also unusual because all its screens use digital projection.

On Sept. 1, Harkins plans to buy the first ticket at his second California theater, in Chino Hills. He also hopes to build a movie house in Indio in the near future. Over the next three years, the company plans an additional 12 theaters in the western U.S.

"They are one of the fastest-growing cinema companies in the United States," said Jim Kozak, spokesman for the National Association of Theatre Owners.

In June 2005, Harkins ranked 18th on the list of movie houses in the country with 278 screens, Kozak said. They would be 15th on that list today, and moving up.

The company pales next to giants such as Regal Entertainment Group, with 6,264 screens; AMC, with 3,308 and Carmike Cinemas, with 2,450

But its history, traditions and unusual features make it stand out, Harkins said, and helped it survive industry turmoil in 2000 and early 2001, when five major theater chains filed for bankruptcy. "That was a banner year for us," he said.

Founded in 1933 by Dan's father, Red Harkins, the company made a name for itself in the 1960s and '70s Arizona with the Cine Capri, an 800-seat theater. Over the years, it expanded around Phoenix and eventually throughout Arizona.

Although he has received buyout offers, Harkins said he wouldn't know what to do without the business.

"My dream is to own and operate the best motion-picture theaters anyone could operate, and I already do that," he said.

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Scott D. Neff
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From: San Francisco, CA
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 - posted June 26, 2006 04:58 PM      Profile for Scott D. Neff   Email Scott D. Neff         Edit/Delete Post 
I drove by and got some really bad photos of the theatre during the construction stage. I shoulda just manned up and walked in through one of the exits doors and acted confused while I snapped photos.

Oh well. It looks like yet another Harkins Theatre. Same color scheme, lobby preview screen with projector, etc. etc. I'm sure the people in Moreno Valley will eat it up, but as far as the rest of the chain goes, I could see nothing that would separate it from the rest of the bunch.

Next time I'm down in the area, I hope to visit the Ultra Stars to get some good detailed photos of the two locations. Maybe by then I'll have a name for who to talk to at Harkins for photo permissions.

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Michael Coate
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From: Los Angeles, CA
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 - posted June 28, 2006 02:49 PM      Profile for Michael Coate   Email Michael Coate         Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
"We are looking to states west of the Mississippi (River) and mostly contiguous to Arizona, and in communities that are underserved," said Harkins, company president and chief executive. "Moreno Valley is the most underserved community in the Inland Empire."
That's easy for the Harkins folks to claim since they just built a new complex in the same parking lot as a competitor!

quote:
Founded in 1933 by Dan's father, Red Harkins, the company made a name for itself in the 1960s and '70s Arizona with the Cine Capri, an 800-seat theater.
Here they go again... [ [Roll Eyes] ] ... taking credit for a theater that they did not build or originally operate. (It was opened by ABC/InterMountain and also operated by Plitt and Cineplex Odeon before Harkins aquired it...only to demolish it shortly thereafter.) If the company is so high on the Cine Capri, then maybe they shouldn't have torn it down. Instead, they seem to be trying to recreate it in many of their new complexes.

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Mike Rivest
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From: Montreal,QC
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 - posted June 30, 2006 10:41 AM      Profile for Mike Rivest   Author's Homepage   Email Mike Rivest         Edit/Delete Post 
 -

here is the ad. [Smile]

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Dan Roben
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From: Seattle, WA
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 - posted June 30, 2006 09:31 PM      Profile for Dan Roben           Edit/Delete Post 
Quote: "I could see nothing that would separate it from the rest of the bunch." - Scott Neff

And that's the major problem with today's new builds. They're all interchangable-cookie cutter stamped out if you will. I love how advertisements for new theaters brag about "Stadium Seating!", "Cup-holders!" "High-back Seats!". Sigh . . . they all do! I remember when you could tell a GCC from a Mann from an SRO from an ACT III . . . just by the unique designs of their theaters. Now, it doesn't really matter who builds them, because they are all just the same. Perusing the auditorium shots on Cinematour seems to back me up on this.

Am I wrong here? I'd love to hear any others' views, agreeing or otherwise.

Okay, I'll get down off my soapbox now.

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Scott D. Neff
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From: San Francisco, CA
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 - posted July 01, 2006 10:01 AM      Profile for Scott D. Neff   Email Scott D. Neff         Edit/Delete Post 
Well let's not forget that all the Mann, UA and GCC designs were each very generic when you got down to it. Especially GCC. [Razz] And nowadays it's the same thing. You can tell a Harkins from a Regal from a Cinemark from a Century. It's just that most chains don't vary their style and try to do something unique each time.

Even ACT III who built beautiful theatres ended up with similar floor plans and layouts, just a slightly different motif each time.

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Christopher Crouch
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From: Anaheim, CA
Registered: Feb 2006


 - posted July 01, 2006 02:47 PM      Profile for Christopher Crouch   Email Christopher Crouch         Edit/Delete Post 
The "McMega-plex" look is the result of trying to keep construction/development costs down.

If a large chain were to start from scratch, with a completely new concept on each build, the construction costs would skyrocket, it would take longer to complete theatres, and there would be more incidents of design errors. That's why chains usually come up with a master plan for given periods.

Really, it's not tied in to the modern megaplex era, as you can see a uniformity to most old multiplexes too. Visit enough older theatres and you can usually master being able to determine the original chain and era, of nearly any theatre, at first sight.

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Dan Roben
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From: Seattle, WA
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 - posted July 01, 2006 10:53 PM      Profile for Dan Roben           Edit/Delete Post 
I appreciate the responses so far.

Scott, while I certainly agree that theaters within a chain were uniform (especially GCC), I still contend that you KNEW when you were in a GCC or an ACT III etc. But Act III theaters were of a totally different design from GCC builds of the same time frame.

Christopher, while in a perfect world, it would be nice to have a unique design for each theater in a chain, of course I know that this would be much too expensive as well as impractical. But I would like to see each chain take on its own look and character with all of its theaters, as they once did. It's why I'll gladly attend a film at the Regal Mountlake 9 or Alderwood Stadium 7 (orginally Act III builds) but won't set foot in the Regal Marysville 14 (a Regal build). The difference is night and day.

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Christopher Crouch
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 - posted July 10, 2006 01:57 AM      Profile for Christopher Crouch   Email Christopher Crouch         Edit/Delete Post 
I do have to admit that I'm not a fan of the Harkins' megaplex style I've seen. The overly abundant neon, bright colors, chaotic decor, and turnstiles leave me with kind of a carnival or state fair feel (the same reason I don't care for many modern Cinemarks).

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Richard A Stegman Jr
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From: Calimesa,CA
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 - posted January 02, 2007 09:43 AM      Profile for Richard A Stegman Jr   Email Richard A Stegman Jr         Edit/Delete Post 
I went here on December 30 to see "Pursuit Of Happyness".

Gaudy looking lobby with an overhead screen off to the left of the concession stand showing trailers.
Nice comfy seats in a good size auditorium.(#15)
Decent picture.
Choppy sound during trailers.(fine during the movie though.)
No commercials,just a very loud "Dolby" trailer featuring the cast of the show "STOMP!".

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John J. Fink
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 - posted January 02, 2007 04:58 PM      Profile for John J. Fink   Author's Homepage   Email John J. Fink         Edit/Delete Post 
National Amusements is a great example of this, in the 1990's they built 12-plex theaters from the exsact same floor plans - two big theaters on one end, two medium sized next to them, and 8 small ones. Large rounded lobby front. See Showcase Berlin (Berlin, CT), Showcase East Windsor (East Windsor, CT), Showcase Southington (Southington, CT), Multiplex Hazlet (Hazlet, NJ) and I'm sure countless more. They are all the exact same design with a slightly diffrent interior (and Berlin and East Windsor have been updated with stadium seating). But their design didn't look anything like General Cinema. The designs are still diffrent today - AMC has a signature style, as does National and Regal.

AMC's Rockaway 16, a theater designed by Loews is an interesting example of a "what if" senerio. They have branded the entire complex AMC, foregrounding the LCE searchlight logos as artwork. I'm guessing once AMC is free of Fandango.com and Screenvision they will rebrand all Loews/Cineplex Oden sites. I don't know how they broke Fandango's deal with General Cinema, but those sites in four months were completely rebranded as AMC, the only trace of the former owner is on the THX certificate framed behind the customer service desk at Clifton Commons.

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