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» Cinematour Forum   » Cinemas and Theatres   » Largest multiplex? (Page 2)

 
This topic comprises 4 pages: 1  2  3  4 
 
Author Topic: Largest multiplex?
Ron Newman
Member

Posts: 145
From: Somerville, MA
Registered: Jan 2005


 - posted July 17, 2005 08:39 AM      Profile for Ron Newman   Email Ron Newman         Edit/Delete Post 
Oops. If I'd realized that other thread existed, I wouldn't have started this one.

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Adam Martin
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From: Dallas, TX
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted July 17, 2005 08:58 AM      Profile for Adam Martin   Author's Homepage   Email Adam Martin         Edit/Delete Post 
Haha! I knew that thread was here somewhere!

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Ron Newman
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Posts: 145
From: Somerville, MA
Registered: Jan 2005


 - posted July 17, 2005 09:24 PM      Profile for Ron Newman   Email Ron Newman         Edit/Delete Post 
For the record, here are AMC's fourteen 30-screen theatres as of today, according to their website:

Chicago area: Cantera 30, South Barrington 30
Columbus, Ohio: Easton 30
Dallas-Fort Worth area: Grapevine Mills 30, Mesquite 30
Detroit area: Forum 30
Houston area: Gulf Pointe 30, Studio 30
Kansas City area: Studio 30
Los Angeles area: Covina 30, Ontario Mills 30, The Block 30
Phoenix area: Deer Valley 30
Toronto area: Interchange 30

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Daryl C. W. O'Shea
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Posts: 181
From: Midland, Ontario, Canada
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted July 19, 2005 02:07 AM      Profile for Daryl C. W. O'Shea   Email Daryl C. W. O'Shea         Edit/Delete Post 
AMC has closed around 10 screens in various 30 plexes in the past too due to lack of product/prints/demand.

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George Gates
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Posts: 55
From: Providence, RI
Registered: May 2005


 - posted July 19, 2005 06:20 AM      Profile for George Gates           Edit/Delete Post 
Sometimes one has to shake their head and say "what were they thinking?" when films are playing on multiple screens right from opening day. Didn't they think about the cost of booth equipment and installation when they made their decisions?

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Tom Mundell
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Posts: 93
From: Silver Spring, MD
Registered: Nov 2003


 - posted July 19, 2005 06:38 AM      Profile for Tom Mundell   Author's Homepage   Email Tom Mundell         Edit/Delete Post 
Yeah, that's exactly what I was wondering...it sure seemed to take a while to realize the mistake.

How did they decide which auditoriums to close? Was it just the 10 smallest, or did they close an entire wing of the building regardless of what size the auditoriums were? Did they permanently close them (remove equipment and such), or can then be opened again in the event of a particulary busy weekend?

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Ron Newman
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Posts: 145
From: Somerville, MA
Registered: Jan 2005


 - posted July 19, 2005 11:35 AM      Profile for Ron Newman   Email Ron Newman         Edit/Delete Post 
There are far more than 30 films available at one time. Closing screens, instead of using them to promote "smaller" films, reflects an extreme lack of imagination on the part of the theatre operator.

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Dave Felthous
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From: Seattle, WA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted July 19, 2005 08:21 PM      Profile for Dave Felthous   Email Dave Felthous         Edit/Delete Post 
"Small" films don't make any money in most mainstream multiplexes. It's cheaper to keep screens dark than hire staff and rent movies that may well be much better than what's playing on two or three screens but won't gross much. My theater always does well with "smaller" movies, when we get them, and we had hoped to get more after our competitor opened a nearby megaplex that's getting all the high-grossers. But, alas, we just show mainstream stuff until its playing to empty houses. And even then they keep getting held over.

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Mark Hajducki
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From: Edinburgh, Scotland
Registered: Sep 2003


 - posted July 20, 2005 08:21 AM      Profile for Mark Hajducki   Email Mark Hajducki         Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
How did they decide which auditoriums to close? Was it just the 10 smallest, or did they close an entire wing of the building regardless of what size the auditoriums were?
I would suspect that they would try to close a whole wing/floor/section rather than a few isolated screens. Having large lengths of empty corridors could pose a security risk. In many (but not all) large multiplexes I have seen the larger screens are located closer to the entrance/foyer than the smaller screens. Another concideration would be what (if any) other uses the screens could be used for with only limited alteration.

quote:
Did they permanently close them (remove equipment and such), or can then be opened again in the event of a particulary busy weekend?
The equipment from the Birmingham site (projectors/platter/sound/seating) was moved to the Edinburgh site (which was being built at the time) but I haven't heard of any alternative use for the screens so a future reopen would be possible.

Are there any cinemas which use less screens during quieter weeks than others (possible missing out interlocks) or have the ability to merge smaller auditoria with larger ones for larger screenings? (I have only seen conference centers which can merge auditoria)

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Jim Rankin
(Jim passed away in December 2006)
Posts: 123
From: Milwaukee, WI
Registered: Oct 2003


 - posted July 20, 2005 10:54 AM      Profile for Jim Rankin   Email Jim Rankin         Edit/Delete Post 
Mark, I'm afraid that "merging" movie houses would be a very expensive affair, if practical at all. Unlike conference rooms where there is no intent to use super amplified sound as in cinemas, movies do use such sound as requires the best soundproofing between auditoriums, and moveable walls will not accomplish that without costs approaching that of an entire auditorium, unfortunately. If the study of sound interests you, go to any large or university library and look for books on Acoustics and after some reading, you will appreciate the difficulties to be encountered with moveable, truly soundproof walls.

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George Gates
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Posts: 55
From: Providence, RI
Registered: May 2005


 - posted July 20, 2005 01:06 PM      Profile for George Gates           Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
There are far more than 30 films available at one time. Closing screens, instead of using them to promote "smaller" films, reflects an extreme lack of imagination on the part of the theatre operator.
Smaller films still have film cost, where playing one film on multiple screens doesn't add to that expense. However, when the giant multiplexes open, they usually play a blockbuster on more than one screen, in order to gain seats. The film is interlocked from one platter to another to another, depending on how many auditoriums they want to use. My original point was that if the intention was to gain seats, rather than put in 30 screens, build less, with more seats in each auditorium. Maybe they planned on multiple prints, in order to stagger showtimes. However, the situations where that might be necessary probably only happen once a year, if that. And you still have other issues to deal with.
I would suggest that when making the decision to build a multiplex with 30 screens, ego and inexperience in the field operations took over common sense.

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Ron Newman
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Posts: 145
From: Somerville, MA
Registered: Jan 2005


 - posted July 20, 2005 02:17 PM      Profile for Ron Newman   Email Ron Newman         Edit/Delete Post 
If I'm renting two prints of the same film to show in two auditoriums, won't that cost me twice as much as one print (or nearly so)?

I've always assumed that staggered showtimes are the reason for doing this at all -- so that no matter when a customer walks in, there's another show of the hit film within an hour.

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David Wodeyla
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Posts: 65
From: Natick, MA
Registered: Jun 2004


 - posted July 20, 2005 04:10 PM      Profile for David Wodeyla   Author's Homepage   Email David Wodeyla         Edit/Delete Post 
The film buyer would request a second print for staggered showtimes, and the gross for the two screens would just be added together, so there would essentially be no extra fee. So whether you play one print simultaneously on several screens, or multiple prints, you pay the same film cost.
This is all done to get enough seats for blockbuster films. When running film in smaller auditoriums, the additional screen would help to get a bigger gross. It helps to pay the guarantee quicker, and the distributor likes it because his terms are better in the opening couple of weeks. The staggered times aren't so that people can walk in anytime, they're to help with crowd control, and improve concession business, As well as pick up overflow to other pictures.

I'm sure there are others who can explain other details on the subject, as well as give an opinion on reasons for certain scheduling issues and multiple prints vs interlock. In addition some areas do better with earlier showtimes, compared with later, and schedules are adjusted for those quirks, as well as idiosycracies with parking, competition, etc. There's a lot to consider that the customer doesn't even consider.

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Daryl C. W. O'Shea
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Posts: 181
From: Midland, Ontario, Canada
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted July 20, 2005 10:08 PM      Profile for Daryl C. W. O'Shea   Email Daryl C. W. O'Shea         Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
How did they decide which auditoriums to close? Was it just the 10 smallest, or did they close an entire wing of the building regardless of what size the auditoriums were?
Usually, if not always, it's a block of theatres furthest from the lobby.

quote:
Did they permanently close them (remove equipment and such), or can then be opened again in the event of a particulary busy weekend?
I haven't heard of any AMCs that have permanently closed auditoriums. I believe they've all been short term -- such as just for the winter season. Re-opening auditoriums wouldn't be a last minute decision though. You're talking about making a decision at least a week in advance so that adequate prints can be booked, staff scheduled and anything else that needs to happen can happen.

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George Gates
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Posts: 55
From: Providence, RI
Registered: May 2005


 - posted July 21, 2005 05:30 AM      Profile for George Gates           Edit/Delete Post 
I don't understand the interest in which auditoriums in a megaplex are closed. Why would it matter?

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