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» Cinematour Forum   » Cinemas and Theatres   » Theatre Photos (Page 2)

 
This topic comprises 3 pages: 1  2  3 
 
Author Topic: Theatre Photos
Tom Mundell
Member

Posts: 93
From: Silver Spring, MD
Registered: Nov 2003


 - posted January 24, 2005 10:19 AM      Profile for Tom Mundell   Author's Homepage   Email Tom Mundell         Edit/Delete Post 
Actually I've only lived in Waltham for about 5 years now (originally from New Jersey), so I'm not familiar with the Cinema I&II.

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David Wodeyla
Member

Posts: 65
From: Natick, MA
Registered: Jun 2004


 - posted January 24, 2005 11:18 AM      Profile for David Wodeyla   Author's Homepage   Email David Wodeyla         Edit/Delete Post 
To Scott, that Cinema sign behind you in your avatar looks like a
General Cinema sign. Which one might that have been?

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Scott Norwood
New Member

Posts: 40
From: Boston, MA
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted January 24, 2005 11:23 AM      Profile for Scott Norwood   Author's Homepage   Email Scott Norwood         Edit/Delete Post 
Brad -- the only pics I have of Framingham are of the booth at the "new" Framingham (built in the mid 1990s). It's nothing exciting--standard GCC Cinemeccanica booth.

I wish I'd taken pics of the "old" Framingham before it was torn down a year or two earlier....

The JJ in Chestnut Hill cinema #1 (see pics on F-T) came from the old Framingham to replace a Norelco.

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David Wodeyla
Member

Posts: 65
From: Natick, MA
Registered: Jun 2004


 - posted January 24, 2005 01:19 PM      Profile for David Wodeyla   Author's Homepage   Email David Wodeyla         Edit/Delete Post 
Here's a photo of Ralph Nugnes in Booth V and VI taken around 1982.
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The seat he's in came from the Gorman downtown, before they tore it down in 1968.

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Scott Norwood
New Member

Posts: 40
From: Boston, MA
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted January 24, 2005 04:57 PM      Profile for Scott Norwood   Author's Homepage   Email Scott Norwood         Edit/Delete Post 
Here's a shot of the booth at the "new" Framingham, taken circa 2001. This is the projector for cinema 6, one of the two largest houses.

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Phil Dincecco
New Member

Posts: 6
From: Norton, MA
Registered: Dec 2004


 - posted January 24, 2005 09:12 PM      Profile for Phil Dincecco   Email Phil Dincecco         Edit/Delete Post 
General Cinema hosted MS windows seminars at many locations throught the US. This is the new Framingham, although it was built in 1995 so it's not that new but it is still a great looking theatre!

[ January 25, 2005, 07:54 AM: Message edited by: Phil Dincecco ]

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David Wodeyla
Member

Posts: 65
From: Natick, MA
Registered: Jun 2004


 - posted January 25, 2005 03:18 PM      Profile for David Wodeyla   Author's Homepage   Email David Wodeyla         Edit/Delete Post 
The old Framingham had an extra 3rd concession stand which was usually only opened on the weekends. Because it was considered isolated from the rest of the crew, smaller, and older, the kids referred to it as "the pit". Here's a black and white photo of this infamous (to the crew circa 1977-1983) candy stand.
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Scott D. Neff
Tour Guide

Posts: 661
From: San Francisco, CA
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted January 25, 2005 07:14 PM      Profile for Scott D. Neff   Email Scott D. Neff         Edit/Delete Post 
What a great photo. Maybe I'll superimpose myself over the "Refreshment" sign sometime. [Wink]

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David Wodeyla
Member

Posts: 65
From: Natick, MA
Registered: Jun 2004


 - posted February 04, 2005 08:31 PM      Profile for David Wodeyla   Author's Homepage   Email David Wodeyla         Edit/Delete Post 
Here's a photo of the classic General Cinema shadowbox at the old Framingham Cinema III. (Taken after the 1st large auditorium split and Cinema II became III.)
I never really liked the white shadowbox style, as I felt it was distracting, as were the white seatbacks. This photo was a black and white, which I tinted using photoshop.
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Jim Rankin
(Jim passed away in December 2006)
Posts: 123
From: Milwaukee, WI
Registered: Oct 2003


 - posted February 05, 2005 12:21 PM      Profile for Jim Rankin   Email Jim Rankin         Edit/Delete Post 
Dave Wodeyla: Is the lobby you picture previously in the Loew's NATICK on Worchester Rd., or the one across the street in Framingham, the AMC multiplex, which according to this listing: http://www.cinematreasures.org/theater/9267/ is still in operation?

Perhaps this is the listing here as #6455 labeled as the FRAMINGHAM-6, aka: CINEMA SHOPPERS WORLD?

To those interested in decor, the grille shown backing the concession stand in Dave's photo, is the famous "Sculpta-Grille" pattern called "Persian-Latticed" and I gave a history of this then innovative cast plastic grillework in my Award-winning article in MARQUEE magazine of Second Quarter, 2004 titled: "Ornamentation Old and New: Grillework in Theatres." I hope that someone thought to preserve that grillework, since pieces of it, or the other seven styles it came in, now sell on E-bay for hundreds of dollars the square foot! I sent small samples of some of the sytles to the Theatre Historical Society in Elmhurst, Illinois, so researchers there may be able to see examples of what the theatres/cinemas of the '60s and 70s looked like.

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David Wodeyla
Member

Posts: 65
From: Natick, MA
Registered: Jun 2004


 - posted February 05, 2005 08:55 PM      Profile for David Wodeyla   Author's Homepage   Email David Wodeyla         Edit/Delete Post 
The photo showing the grillwork behind the candy stand was from the original General Cinema Theatre in Shoppers World, not the Loews, which was across the street. Neither building still exists. Or as one other poster would say, "they are all demolished". You can see a closer picture on my website in the photo called "inventory at the pit" (under Shoppers World and Behind the Scenes)
The AMC theatre in Framingham now, is not the same building as the original Shopppers World Cinema, built in 1951)

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Tom Mundell
Member

Posts: 93
From: Silver Spring, MD
Registered: Nov 2003


 - posted February 06, 2005 07:26 AM      Profile for Tom Mundell   Author's Homepage   Email Tom Mundell         Edit/Delete Post 
Was there any reason for the GC shadowbox? (was there any intended functional purpose, or was it just supposed look neat?)

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William Hooper
Member

Posts: 82
From: Mobile, AL
Registered: Mar 2003


 - posted February 07, 2005 12:26 AM      Profile for William Hooper   Email William Hooper         Edit/Delete Post 
I've never seen one of the GCC "shadowbox" auditoriums, but I've always been morbidly interested in them. Fixed 2:1 screens with no movable masking?

The "shadowbox" surround was white or another light color?

There was an article about measurements of contrast in a SMPTE Journal several years ago, & one interesting section was about measurements of "perceived" contrast vs. actual contrast.

Pictures presented in an area with a white border around them were *perceived* as having more contrast than the same picture with a dark border. They of course had no more actual contrast; the two were the same picture.

You can see this when you get pictures back with white borders instead of borderless: the pictures seem to have higher contrast, but the border somehow reduces the impact of the picture. It's because you're processing the sensation of your iris as it's oscillating back & forth from the light border to the darker picture area, & is being interpreted as the response to a high-contrast picture.

Shortly after the publication of that SMPTE Journal article, all the TV's being sold in showrooms no longer had black surrounds around the tube. Instead, they had light grey or light silver. The idea obviously was that in a showroom, those pictures would be perceived as having more contrast than the ones on TV's with black surrounds.

Of course, the light colored surround is more distracting & it's more quickly fatiguing to watch stuff on those sets with the light-colored surrounds. But that's not the point, the point is moving them in the showroom.

I'd like another TV, but now they've all got light-colored surrounds around the tube.

Shadowbox TV's!

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David Wodeyla
Member

Posts: 65
From: Natick, MA
Registered: Jun 2004


 - posted February 07, 2005 01:29 PM      Profile for David Wodeyla   Author's Homepage   Email David Wodeyla         Edit/Delete Post 
I think the architect, Riseman Associates, like the look. The white plaster glowed blue from the overhead banks of lights. When I first saw Cinema II in Framingham, in 1964 to attend Cleopatra, I thought the auditorium looked too bright.
A few years later, when it was pointed out that we had some picture splash onto the sides, I learned how important a perfect filing of the aperture plate was. The D.M. was constantly looking for these details.

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Dave Felthous
Member

Posts: 186
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted February 07, 2005 05:32 PM      Profile for Dave Felthous   Email Dave Felthous         Edit/Delete Post 
GCC had one shadowbox-screen theater in the Seattle area, the Renton Village I-II (which soon became I-II-III with the division of one auditorium). It looked neat before the movie, with the whole end of the auditorium glowing purple. But when the movie started there was this expanse of white on either side of the image. The white was distracting. Future GCC theaters in my area did not have this type of screen.

GCC also didn't believe in traverse masking or stereo sound for many years. It was forced to stereoize one auditorium in each theater if it wanted to play Return of the Jedi, which George Lucas wouldn't allow shown in mono in competitive markets.

In most cases there was no space behind the screen for multiple speakers, so the left and rights were outside the screen perimeter. You'd see the action on the screen but hear it several feet offscreen. Pretty crummy presentation.

The only surviving GCC theater in the Seattle area is the Everett Mall I-II-III, now run by Regal. The big house has outside-the-screen speakers, but in the other two, tunnel-like, theaters the back walls (concrete block) were jackhammered away and multiple-speaker chambers created.

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