CinemaTour
Cinema History Around the World
 HOME ·· CINEMAS ·· FORUM ·· LINKS ·· BOOKS
 Contact Cinematour ·· Help & Hints ·· About Cinematour
Cinematour Forum


  
my profile | my password | search | faq | forum home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Cinematour Forum   » Cinemas in the News   » AMC Century City (Page 4)

 
This topic comprises 4 pages: 1  2  3  4 
 
Author Topic: AMC Century City
Jeff Arellano
Senior Member

Posts: 685
From: Monterey Park, CA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted November 07, 2006 04:19 PM      Profile for Jeff Arellano   Email Jeff Arellano         Edit/Delete Post 
Jesus Chris, about time is right!

The old Century conversion to stores is almost complete.

 |  IP: Logged

Jason Carr
New Member

Posts: 6
From: Traverse City, MI
Registered: Nov 2005


 - posted December 19, 2007 04:19 PM      Profile for Jason Carr   Email Jason Carr         Edit/Delete Post 
Does anyone know if they are adding a new IMAX auditorium to this theater? I just read a press release about a deal between IMAX and AMC and one of the paragraphs says:

The rollout of the first 50 IMAX digital projection systems will begin in July 2008 at premier AMC theatre locations in 24 of the 33 selected markets, with an additional 25 scheduled for rollout in 2009 and 25 more in 2010. The IMAX theatres are slated to be installed in many of AMC's top-performing locations in the United States, including: AMC South Barrington 30, Chicago; AMC Mesquite 30, Dallas; AMC Gulf Pointe 30, Houston; AMC Century City 15, Los
Angeles; AMC Empire 25, New York; AMC Neshaminy 24, Philadelphia; AMC Eastridge 15, San Francisco; AMC Hoffman Center 22, Washington D.C.

http://www.reuters.com/article/pressRelease/idUS112080+07-Dec-2007+PRN20071207

 |  IP: Logged

David Au
Member

Posts: 133
From: Walnut Creek, CA
Registered: Sep 2006


 - posted December 19, 2007 05:13 PM      Profile for David Au   Email David Au         Edit/Delete Post 
I believe that they are going to be converting an existing auditorium into an Imax auditorium at this theater. It has been done before at other AMC theaters. They added a new screen that was bigger (mostly taller) and also added a much more powerful sound system. Some seats in the front were removed to make way for the bigger screen. There are many ways to add a bigger screen. Dig down and make the area in front deeper to fit a bigger screen or they could raise the ceiling and expand the auditorium to the sides.

The reason that Imax wants to create so many new theaters is profit. More Imax screens mean more money. Customers want to see movies on giant Imax screens with huge sound. Imax also is installing digital projectors to cut costs. The cost of distributing movies on actual film is very expensive. Imax wants to distribute movies digitally and save millions of dollars.

Will people patronize these Imax theaters? Yes. If they advertise these Imax giant screen movies well, people will flock to see them. As to the actual picture quality, yes the resolution of digital will be lower than actual film, but people are very easily satisfied by picture quality these days. There is a new generation of people who watch movies on their ipods, pixelated computer screens, small tv's, etc. A giant screen beats these by far. Even if the digital picture is pixelated and slightly darker than film(digital is not very good at reproducing colors), most people will still enjoy seeing movies in new digital Imax theaters. Only part of the movie experience is the picture quality, there is also the spectacular surround sound of an Imax movie, and the overall escape into an immersive big screen experience.

[ December 19, 2007, 06:44 PM: Message edited by: David Au ]

 |  IP: Logged

Dan Roben
Member

Posts: 155
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: May 2003


 - posted December 19, 2007 08:57 PM      Profile for Dan Roben           Edit/Delete Post 
Be aware. Be very aware.

It is my understanding that these so-called "IMAX" screens will not be the gargantuan six-story screens we all know and have experienced.

Rather, it's an attempt to prop up the bottom line of a rapidly failing company. In this case, IMAX will install IMAX Digital projection systems in existing AMC screens. IMAX will then get a percentage of the ticket price. It is assumed that more people will flock to an IMAX branded screen. Maybe, maybe not. Time will tell if a customer will pay the higher ticket price once they discover that it really isn't IMAX. I'm also not convinced that sound systems will be ugraded.

As far as I know, AMC is not planning to do any retrofitting to install larger screens. Anyone who has been to the Empire 25 in Times Square knows that it would be next to impossible to do this without considerable cost borne by AMC.

What's really happening here is the cheapening of a well-known brand (IMAX) into something that it currently isn't, much like when Cinerama changed to single-strip 70MM in the early 60s. And we all know what happened to Cinerama. I think IMAX is not long for this world.

In short, this is not your father's IMAX.

 |  IP: Logged

David Au
Member

Posts: 133
From: Walnut Creek, CA
Registered: Sep 2006


 - posted December 20, 2007 05:13 PM      Profile for David Au   Email David Au         Edit/Delete Post 
I think everyone will have to wait and see. I definitely will check out one of the new Imax screens, since there will be one much closer to me. I'm sure the new Imax screens won't be empty. The day theaters are empty will be the day that all multiplexes close.

As long as there is a movie picture on the screen, there will be people in the seats. Some theater chains have gone all digital. 3D movies charge up to $2.50 extra these days. I don't see people boycotting theaters because they use digital projectors and don't use film anymore. In fact, people are seeking out digital 3D movies over the 2D version. They don't mind the extra $2.50 if it is in 3D. My friends who work at theaters have told me that digital showtimes sell out much more than regular film. People seek out "Digital." If it is new and sounds interesting, people will buy it. That's what I call marketing.

This move by Imax might actually work out. They don't have much to lose. If the prices are too high, they can lower the prices.

 |  IP: Logged

Chris Utley
Senior Member

Posts: 631
From: Torrance, CA
Registered: May 2003


 - posted December 20, 2007 10:21 PM      Profile for Chris Utley   Author's Homepage   Email Chris Utley         Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
It is my understanding that these so-called "IMAX" screens will not be the gargantuan six-story screens we all know and have experienced.
Case in point: the "IMAX" house at Wehrenberg's Ronnie's 20 in the St. Louis area. Went there in summer 2006 to see "Superman Returns." Planned my whole vacation around seeing the flick there. Got there super early to be one of the first in line.

In the end, the screen was no bigger than the ones at Century sans masking. I was disappointed till I realized I wasn't in LA. [Rolling on Floor Laughing]

 |  IP: Logged

Scott D. Neff
Tour Guide

Posts: 661
From: San Francisco, CA
Registered: Feb 2003


 - posted December 22, 2007 10:42 AM      Profile for Scott D. Neff   Email Scott D. Neff         Edit/Delete Post 
Most IMAX screens tied into Multiplexes aren't the traditionally huge IMAX theatres. Single screen IMAX theatres have an entire full-time staff devoted to getting the seats filled with childrens groups etc. I think IMAX finally realized that chains weren't going to spend all the overhead to make that happen, and started licensing them equipment for 200 seat houses that they could effectively fill.

 |  IP: Logged

Eric Gieszl
Member

Posts: 57
From: Las Vegas
Registered: Sep 2006


 - posted January 05, 2008 11:44 AM      Profile for Eric Gieszl           Edit/Delete Post 
That's partly true, but all IMAX screens tied into a traditional multiplex were the giant screens until several years ago when IMAX released the MPX system.

At that point there was a large increase in IMAX screens, BUT these new installs cheated the consumer of the true IMAX experience. The IMAX MPX system requires nearly no modifications to an existing movie auditorium. The screen is larger, but not comparable to a true IMAX install.

IMAX also had to develop a projector that would fit into a traditional booth and not require a separate cooling room to cool the bulbs. Traditional IMAX projectors are supervised by a projector every minute they are operating.

IMAX MPX screens are typically about 30 feet tall and 50 feet wide (it varies). In some cases they will bow the screen out at the floor and ceiling to make it fit.

Until the digital MPX release next summer you at least got a true 15/70 presentation. However, now that they're going to digital projection (which sucks) you'll be cheated on the picture quality as well as the size of the projected image.

If you're going to pay extra for an IMAX DMR presentation of Hollywood product then I highly advise you to see the film in a "true" IMAX theatre. IMAX MPX is a rip off and the destruction of the IMAX brand.

Fortunately, Los Angeles has several true IMAX theatres: AMC Universal City, The Bridge Cinema de Lux, Edwards Irvine Spectrum 21 and Edwards Ontario Stadium 22. Irvine Spectrum has the largest screen, but The Bridge Cinema de Lux has probably the BEST IMAX theatre ever built in terms of sound quality and the screen is huge at 61 feet high x 93 feet wide.

 |  IP: Logged

David Au
Member

Posts: 133
From: Walnut Creek, CA
Registered: Sep 2006


 - posted January 05, 2008 10:40 PM      Profile for David Au   Email David Au         Edit/Delete Post 
I read about the recently opened Imax at the flagship Regal Pinnacle in Knoxville. The Imax screen was installed into an existing auditorium. The screen is only 61 feet wide and 36 feet tall. However, I heard that the sound is much better and louder.

The best Imax theater that I have ever been in was at Great America in Santa Clara, California. I saw 2 true Imax movies there. One was the Last Buffalo in 3D. The movies came free of charge with park admission. The screen was huge and the sound was thunderously loud. The seating was incredibly steep and the theater itself was gigantic inside. It was a classic example of a true 1978 Imax theater and seated 980 people. The line for the theater was very long and it was amazingly popular. I was lucky to get a seat.

I've also seen the Imax at AMC Loews Metreon in San Francisco. The screen is 97.6 by 75.6 ft but it doesn't hold as many people as the one that used to be at Great America. I also saw the Imax at Regal Hacienda Crossing in Dublin, CA. That one is a little smaller than the Metreon, but it is still a true Imax design. I saw Transformers there and there were only 3 other people in the theater. I still had a great time. It was like my own private theater.

 |  IP: Logged



All times are Central
This topic comprises 4 pages: 1  2  3  4 
 
   Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic    next oldest topic   next newest topic
Hop To:

© 1995-2013 Vision Entertainment Services. All rights reserved.

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.3.1.2